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7/16/2018
03:00 PM

10 Ways to Protect Protocols That Aren't DNS

Here's how to safeguard three other network foundation protocols so they don't become weapons or critical vulnerabilities.
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BGP: Protect the Speaker
BGP is a way for routers to let other routers know where they are and for the routers, as a group, to establish the best way to send packets from one address to another. Part of the process is establishing that a router is still on the Internet: This is done via the speaker, which sends a TCP message on port 179 every 60 seconds to keep the connection to its neighbor alive. If the speaker is taken down, it not only disrupts the router's presence on the Internet, it also opens the door for a substitute, illegitimate router to be inserted in its place.
Obviously, a critical network link that communicates regularly on a known port is vulnerable, so network owners need to take special precautions to protect it. As a first step, the IETF recommends an access control list (ACL) that rejects traffic from any router not explicitly a neighbor.
Next, the network admin should instigate rate limiting on both the control and data planes so that a packet flood can't take the speaker off the network. Rate limiting should be put in place to protect against both attacks and an excessive volume of legitimate traffic that could take the network off the Internet.
(Image: Eaum M VIA SHUTTERSTOCK)

BGP: Protect the Speaker

BGP is a way for routers to let other routers know where they are and for the routers, as a group, to establish the best way to send packets from one address to another. Part of the process is establishing that a router is still on the Internet: This is done via the speaker, which sends a TCP message on port 179 every 60 seconds to keep the connection to its neighbor alive. If the speaker is taken down, it not only disrupts the router's presence on the Internet, it also opens the door for a substitute, illegitimate router to be inserted in its place.

Obviously, a critical network link that communicates regularly on a known port is vulnerable, so network owners need to take special precautions to protect it. As a first step, the IETF recommends an access control list (ACL) that rejects traffic from any router not explicitly a neighbor.

Next, the network admin should instigate rate limiting on both the control and data planes so that a packet flood can't take the speaker off the network. Rate limiting should be put in place to protect against both attacks and an excessive volume of legitimate traffic that could take the network off the Internet.

(Image: Eaum M VIA SHUTTERSTOCK)

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Jon M. Kelley
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Jon M. Kelley,
User Rank: Moderator
7/19/2018 | 12:01:23 PM
Too many tabs, too little info
THis is the first time this year that I've gone through one of DRs multitab "specials".  To be honest this post subject still explains why I skip them:  too many slow loading tabs, with almost no relevant text per tab. Tabs with less than 100 words - get real.  Maybe I'll try again near Christmas.
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