Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Operational Security //

Physical Security

11/1/2018
09:35 AM
Alan
 Zeichick
Alan Zeichick
Alan Zeichick
50%
50%

Let's Get Physical: Why Protecting Hardware Is Essential to Good Cybersecurity

Enterprises need to consider physical security as part of any comprehensive cybersecurity plan.

If possession is nine-tenths of the law, then undetected physical access is nine-tenths of the way to a successful cyber attack.

Many of us know how to protect servers and routers from unauthorized individuals, whether they're visitors, burglars, trespassers, or employees. Those protections, though, aren't enough.

Security starts at home -- in some cases, literally. Not long ago, my wife and I were staying in a small bed and breakfast that happened to be near a major company's local office. The WiFi access point sat on a table between several of the bedrooms, and had an "insert paperclip to reset" switch.

What are the odds that we could have broken into that unprotected device and potentially configured a hack?

Perhaps a hack that would let us eavesdrop on unencrypted traffic, like email logins or passwords. Maybe we could have overridden the DNS settings, and set up some faux web pages or staged a man-in-the-middle attack. Or even replaced the firmware with a version with a backdoor.

(Source: iStock)
(Source: iStock)

Sure, the odds of a successful payoff might be small from such an attack. What about if we knew that corporate board members would be staying at that B&B next week? If the hardware's not physically secure, then neither is the network.

Far-fetched? Perhaps.

So let's talk about protecting the hardware in official business locations. Are all your servers physically secured from unauthorized access? Maybe. Maybe not. Ask yourself if a thief could unplug a server, stick it on a cart, and walk it out the door during office hours -- or after hours. Or place removable hard drives into a briefcase. (Before the advent of always-on local or cloud backups, removable tapes were pretty easy to pilfer -- and nobody might notice for days or weeks.)

Theft isn't the only worry.

If hackers can get to the servers, they might be able to reboot those devices and make firmware modifications, read unencrypted drives, disable security protections, or plant malware such as keyloggers.

Compared to the one-time theft of a server, such activities could be gifts that keep on giving to malicious actors.

Beyond infiltrating servers, hackers could use physical access to gain access to networking gear or other devices -- and then subvert them. This type of hack is at the heart of what Bloomberg alleged in a controversial story about Chinese spies inserting specialized chips on Supermicro motherboards as part of an elaborate cyber espionage campaign. (See China Hacks Hardware in Spying Attempt on Apple, Amazon & Others Report.)

Some routers, for example, are configured to disallow out-of-band (that is, remote) control from outside the organization's local area network. If a baddie can get to the management console from inside the LAN, or by using a dedicated management port on the device, hacking became a whole lot easier.

Indeed, as the US-Computer Emergency Response Team (US-CERT) team writes in its June 2018 brief, "Securing Network Infrastructure Devices," that type of hardware are ideal targets for malicious cyber actors because organizational and customer traffic must traverse these critical devices. To quote:

  • An attacker with presence on an organization's gateway router can monitor, modify and deny traffic to and from the organization.
  • An attacker with presence on an organization's internal routing and switching infrastructure can monitor, modify and deny traffic to and from key hosts inside the network and leverage trust relationships to conduct lateral movement to other hosts.

A real worry is that network hardware can be neglected by security teams, especially when compared to desktops, servers and mobile devices. Additional risk factors, according to CERT:

  • Manufacturers build and distribute these network devices with exploitable services, which are enabled for ease of installation, operation and maintenance.
  • Owners and operators of network devices often don't change vendor default settings, harden them for operations, or perform regular patching.
  • Internet service providers may not replace equipment on a customer's property once the equipment is no longer supported by the manufacturer or vendor.
  • Owners and operators often overlook network devices when they investigate, look for intruders and restore general-purpose hosts after cyber intrusions.

What can you do?

CERT offers several suggestions for network infrastructure; see which you can readily implement, and make sure you check them periodically.

For servers and other gear, make sure they are locked away, and if possible, have surveillance cameras, motion sensors, and other means of knowing if your server room -- or wiring closet -- is breached.

If you are breached, take it seriously. Because undetected physical access is nine-tenths of the way to a successful hack.

Related posts:

Alan Zeichick is principal analyst at Camden Associates, a technology consultancy in Phoenix, Arizona, specializing in enterprise networking, cybersecurity, and software development. Follow him @zeichick.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Threaded  |  Newest First  |  Oldest First
Edge-DRsplash-10-edge-articles
I Smell a RAT! New Cybersecurity Threats for the Crypto Industry
David Trepp, Partner, IT Assurance with accounting and advisory firm BPM LLP,  7/9/2021
News
Attacks on Kaseya Servers Led to Ransomware in Less Than 2 Hours
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  7/7/2021
Commentary
It's in the Game (but It Shouldn't Be)
Tal Memran, Cybersecurity Expert, CYE,  7/9/2021
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
How Enterprises are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
Concerns over supply chain vulnerabilities and attack visibility drove some significant changes in enterprise cybersecurity strategies over the past year. Dark Reading's 2021 Strategic Security Survey showed that many organizations are staying the course regarding the use of a mix of attack prevention and threat detection technologies and practices for dealing with cyber threats.
Flash Poll
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2018-16060
PUBLISHED: 2021-10-15
Mitsubishi Electric SmartRTU devices allow remote attackers to obtain sensitive information (directory listing and source code) via a direct request to the /web URI.
CVE-2018-16061
PUBLISHED: 2021-10-15
Mitsubishi Electric SmartRTU devices allow XSS via the username parameter or PATH_INFO to login.php.
CVE-2021-27561
PUBLISHED: 2021-10-15
Yealink Device Management (DM) 3.6.0.20 allows command injection as root via the /sm/api/v1/firewall/zone/services URI, without authentication.
CVE-2020-4951
PUBLISHED: 2021-10-15
IBM Cognos Analytics 11.1.7 and 11.2.0 contains locally cached browser data, that could allow a local attacker to obtain sensitive information.
CVE-2021-28021
PUBLISHED: 2021-10-15
Buffer overflow vulnerability in function stbi__extend_receive in stb_image.h in stb 2.26 via a crafted JPEG file.