Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Network Security //

Data Center

10/10/2018
07:00 AM
Scott Ferguson
Scott Ferguson
News Analysis-Security Now
50%
50%

Bloomberg: Major Telecom Also Found Hacked Supermicro Servers

As questions swirled around a Bloomberg story about hardware hacked by Chinese spies, a second story finds that a major telecom also discovered compromised Supermicro servers.

A major US telecom company discovered that servers that used its own data center had been hacked, and this manipulated hardware could be used for spying and industrial espionage within the business, according to another report from Bloomberg.

If true, this new report could bolster that argument that a specialized division within China's army has installed specialized chips and other gear within the motherboards of Supermicro servers, which were then shipped to companies around the world. (See China Hacks Hardware in Spying Attempt on Apple, Amazon & Others Report.)

Bloomberg published a second story about compromised servers on Tuesday, October 9. The report is based on details provided to reporters by Yossi Appleboum, a security expert. Appleboum's company had conducted a security survey of the telecom's data center and found that the server's Ethernet connector had been manipulated.

(Source: iStock)
(Source: iStock)

Those servers were later ripped out of the data center in August of this year.

The Bloomberg report did not name the telecom company.

Last week, Bloomberg reported that spies working for the government of China appeared to have installed highly specialized chips within the motherboards of Supermicro servers. Later, Apple and Amazon each independently discovered the microprocessors, and sent some information to the FBI and other government officials.

The blockbuster story has met a storm of controversy with Supermicro, Apple and Amazon all denying the account. The government of China also denied the report, and the US Department of Homeland Security agreed with the accounts of Apple and other companies. (See Bloomberg Hardware Hacking Story Faces Fierce Backlash From Apple & DHS.)

Tuesday's story is likely to raise more questions about China's role in manipulating the global technology supply chain. The Bloomberg story illustrated that since much of the world's hardware is manufactured in China, the government there is in a unique position to manipulate gear within the factories before it's shipped out to clients.

When contacted by Bloomberg, Supermicro issued a statement, noting that: "We take care to secure the integrity of our products throughout the manufacturing process, and supply chain security is an important topic of discussion for our industry."

Related posts:

— Scott Ferguson is the managing editor of Light Reading and the editor of Security Now. Follow him on Twitter @sferguson_LR.

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Oldest First  |  Newest First  |  Threaded View
Edge-DRsplash-10-edge-articles
I Smell a RAT! New Cybersecurity Threats for the Crypto Industry
David Trepp, Partner, IT Assurance with accounting and advisory firm BPM LLP,  7/9/2021
News
Attacks on Kaseya Servers Led to Ransomware in Less Than 2 Hours
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  7/7/2021
Commentary
It's in the Game (but It Shouldn't Be)
Tal Memran, Cybersecurity Expert, CYE,  7/9/2021
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
How Enterprises are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
Concerns over supply chain vulnerabilities and attack visibility drove some significant changes in enterprise cybersecurity strategies over the past year. Dark Reading's 2021 Strategic Security Survey showed that many organizations are staying the course regarding the use of a mix of attack prevention and threat detection technologies and practices for dealing with cyber threats.
Flash Poll
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2021-33988
PUBLISHED: 2021-10-19
Cross Site Scripting (XSS). vulnerability exists in Microweber CMS 1.2.7 via the Login form, which could let a malicious user execute Javascript by Inserting code in the request form.
CVE-2020-12141
PUBLISHED: 2021-10-19
An out-of-bounds read in the SNMP stack in Contiki-NG 4.4 and earlier allows an attacker to cause a denial of service and potentially disclose information via crafted SNMP packets to snmp_ber_decode_string_len_buffer in os/net/app-layer/snmp/snmp-ber.c.
CVE-2021-29912
PUBLISHED: 2021-10-19
IBM Security Risk Manager on CP4S 1.7.0.0 is vulnerable to cross-site scripting. This vulnerability allows users to embed arbitrary JavaScript code in the Web UI thus altering the intended functionality potentially leading to credentials disclosure within a trusted session. IBM X-Force ID: 207828.
CVE-2021-38911
PUBLISHED: 2021-10-19
IBM Security Risk Manager on CP4S 1.7.0.0 stores user credentials in plain clear text which can be read by a an authenticatedl privileged user. IBM X-Force ID: 209940.
CVE-2021-3746
PUBLISHED: 2021-10-19
A flaw was found in the libtpms code that may cause access beyond the boundary of internal buffers. The vulnerability is triggered by specially-crafted TPM2 command packets that then trigger the issue when the state of the TPM2's volatile state is written. The highest threat from this vulnerability ...