Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Mobile

3/21/2013
05:29 PM
Dark Reading
Dark Reading
Products and Releases
50%
50%

Mobile Device Data Recoveries Up 161 Percent

Across all types of recovery scenarios, Kroll Ontrack found data loss incidents are platform-independent

EPSOM, March 21, 2013 – According to the International Telecommunication Union, the number of mobile phones worldwide is expected to exceed the world's population by 2014, with overall penetration rates reaching 96% globally by the end of this year. Consistent with the widespread adoption of mobile devices, Kroll Ontrack, the world leader in data recovery and edisclosure software, saw a 55% increase in mobile device recoveries for phones and tablets from 2010 to 2011, and a 161% increase from 2011 to 2012. With more and more people storing valuable personal and business data on their mobile devices, there is no doubt the demand for recovery when something goes wrong will continue to climb.

"For mobile devices, physical damage is the most common cause of data loss we see, representing about two-thirds of data recovery cases," said Phil Bridge, managing director, Kroll Ontrack. "Inherent in their purpose, mobile devices are simply on the go, and therefore more susceptible to human error, including drops, which can cause electronic failure, and water damage. The other third are from logical failures, such as accidentally deleted files, corrupt software, password lockout and OS upgrade issues."

Mobile device failure breakdown

Ontrack Data Recovery engineers report that in 2012, for recovery resulting from physical failure, 31% of cases were electronics-related physical damage, 23% were the result of water or moisture damage and seven percent were related to damage to the exterior of the device. For recovery resulting from logical failure, 26% were the result of deleted files, seven percent were software corruption and six percent were cases of password lockout. Across all types of recovery scenarios, Kroll Ontrack has found that data loss incidents are platform independent and occur within iOS, Android, and Windows devices.

Mobile device recovery process

"In most cases, recovery can be attained by way of physical repair or bypassing a corrupted OS," said Robert Winter, chief engineer, Kroll Ontrack. "Once repair or OS bypass is successful, Kroll Ontrack specialised software tools are then used to target critical files and provide customers with comprehensive evaluations and detailed file reports of the files that can be recovered."

Specifically, in instances of physical damage, Ontrack Data Recovery engineers open the device within a cleanroom environment and assess the physical condition of the circuit boards and parts through a comprehensive diagnostic process. The mobile device's printed circuit board (PCB) parts are examined and repaired as needed to get the device to a state where the data can be read. When there is logical failure, such as a corrupt operating system or failed OS update, engineers use specialised software to bypass the identified issue and then access and extract the data.

"When my son dove into a pool with his iPhone in his pocket, he lost hundreds of contacts and two years' worth of photos that were very important to our family," said James Smith. "We had never made a backup of his phone and thought the data was forever lost. With Kroll Ontrack's expertise in mobile phone recoveries, all his data was recovered and restored to his new phone for a very reasonable price and we backed up the information to our family computer."

Tips for handling data loss

The most requested data to be recovered from mobile devices are photos/videos and contacts, followed by notes and text messages. To promote the best chance of success in recovering this valuable data, Kroll Ontrack suggests the following:

· Time is of the essence. Power off the mobile device immediately and get it to a reputable data recovery provider. The longer you wait, the more likely critical data will be overwritten (deleted files) or the drive will corrode (physical damage such as water).

· Backup, backup, backup. Before disaster strikes, back-up your data to another device, such as a laptop, the cloud or an external drive. If you get an operating system error, this backup is often the saving grace in the recovery process.

· Know what you want. The key to recovering data quickly is to know what data to target. Communicate to your data recovery provider what data is most critical to better ensure a timely and accurate recovery.

About Kroll Ontrack Inc.

Kroll Ontrack provides technology-driven services and software to help legal, corporate and government entities as well as consumers manage, recover, search, analyze and produce data efficiently and cost-effectively. In addition to its award-winning suite of software, Kroll Ontrack provides data recovery, data destruction, electronic discovery and document review. Kroll Ontrack is a subsidiary of Altegrity, an industry-leading provider of information solutions. For more information about Kroll Ontrack and its offerings please visit: http://www.krollontrack.co.uk and follow Kroll Ontrack on Twitter @KrollOntrack.

 

Recommended Reading:

Comment  | 
Print  | 
More Insights
Comments
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
COVID-19: Latest Security News & Commentary
Dark Reading Staff 8/3/2020
Pen Testers Who Got Arrested Doing Their Jobs Tell All
Kelly Jackson Higgins, Executive Editor at Dark Reading,  8/5/2020
Exploiting Google Cloud Platform With Ease
Dark Reading Staff 8/6/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
Special Report: Computing's New Normal, a Dark Reading Perspective
This special report examines how IT security organizations have adapted to the "new normal" of computing and what the long-term effects will be. Read it and get a unique set of perspectives on issues ranging from new threats & vulnerabilities as a result of remote working to how enterprise security strategy will be affected long term.
Flash Poll
The Changing Face of Threat Intelligence
The Changing Face of Threat Intelligence
This special report takes a look at how enterprises are using threat intelligence, as well as emerging best practices for integrating threat intel into security operations and incident response. Download it today!
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-16168
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-07
Temi firmware 20190419.165201 does not properly verify that the source of data or communication is valid, aka an Origin Validation Error.
CVE-2020-8025
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-07
A Incorrect Execution-Assigned Permissions vulnerability in the permissions package of SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12-SP4, SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 15-LTSS, SUSE Linux Enterprise Server for SAP 15; openSUSE Leap 15.1, openSUSE Tumbleweed sets the permissions for some of the directories of the p...
CVE-2020-8026
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-07
A Incorrect Default Permissions vulnerability in the packaging of inn in openSUSE Leap 15.2, openSUSE Tumbleweed, openSUSE Leap 15.1 allows local attackers with control of the new user to escalate their privileges to root. This issue affects: openSUSE Leap 15.2 inn version 2.6.2-lp152.1.26 and prior...
CVE-2020-16219
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-07
Delta Electronics TPEditor Versions 1.97 and prior. An out-of-bounds read may be exploited by processing specially crafted project files. Successful exploitation of this vulnerability may allow an attacker to read/modify information, execute arbitrary code, and/or crash the application.
CVE-2020-16221
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-07
Delta Electronics TPEditor Versions 1.97 and prior. A stack-based buffer overflow may be exploited by processing a specially crafted project file. Successful exploitation of this vulnerability may allow an attacker to read/modify information, execute arbitrary code, and/or crash the application.