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Protecting The Network From Bring-Your-Own Vulnerabilities
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hudson.josh
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hudson.josh,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/10/2013 | 3:18:41 AM
re: Protecting The Network From Bring-Your-Own Vulnerabilities
BYOD is a big security problem, but many companies are willing to deal with it because of the potential productivity gains. BYOD devices login on to a network is simply going to be the reality of enterprise IT, but the most important thing is to secure the data and not just on the network but with the various ways device now communicate. Our hospital put a BYOD policy in place to use Tigertext (www.tigertext.com) for HIPAA complient text messaging, mostly to deal with the reality that the doctors were sending patient data over regular SMS which is not HIPAA compliant. The reality was that the doctors were doing this because it was more efficient for them. Now we have the doctor using HIPAA compliant tigertext and the patient processing productivity doubled in the last quarter - a significent business advantage. Yes, BYOD is a big security issue, and yes their are real productivity gain to be had, but IT is going to have to be creative to get them and maintain security.
Snyper82
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Snyper82,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/26/2013 | 3:21:15 PM
re: Protecting The Network From Bring-Your-Own Vulnerabilities
Excellent points, can I get some more "how to suggestions" though?
For example, you quoted that business should care about the data and not the device. This is done in part by encrypting the data, but if the device is compromised, then encryption doesn't do a whole lot - assuming unlocking the device unlocks the encryption.
Am I off base?


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