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Next Generation Of SIEMs? Ease Of Use, Analyze More Data
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mharrison392
mharrison392,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/22/2013 | 8:42:50 PM
re: Next Generation Of SIEMs? Ease Of Use, Analyze More Data
I don't think I want a plug and play SIEM solution. The complexity of all the interconnected parts in unique environments is not something that I am comfortable with a SIEM understanding. It is important that someone in the organization understand how these pieces work together whether a SIEM is implemented or not.

A SIEM solution is a TOOL. It makes the job easier, but it's still a hard job. Knowledge is still required. They used computers in 1969 to put a man on the moon. The people designing the systems and working at mission control still had to know the pieces and parts. They still had to know what they were doing.

The problem is that most people want to purchase a solution that they can install and forget. A SIEM takes care and feeding on a regular basis. A properly installed and configured SIEM requires tuning regularly. However, most SIEM implementations I've seen have had the proverbial "kitchen sink" worth of logs thrown at them day one or week one. It takes time to do this properly. You have to add one feed at a time and spend some time getting to know it and tuning it, then move on to the next log feed.

I believe you could make the argument that anyone wanting a plug a play SIEM should outsource their security operations. The fact of the matter is that real, effective security requires knowledgeable, dedicated, warm bodies. Most organizations are unwilling to accept that.
MarciaNWC
MarciaNWC,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/21/2013 | 11:09:31 PM
re: Next Generation Of SIEMs? Ease Of Use, Analyze More Data
You'd think after this long in the market, SIEMs would have become easier to use. Although, as the story notes, the marketing line with SIEMS has always been the opposite.
AccessServices
AccessServices,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/21/2013 | 12:28:10 PM
re: Next Generation Of SIEMs? Ease Of Use, Analyze More Data
From someone that has lived and worked in the trenches, I agree with Robert. SIEMs are complicated beasts. They capture data from multiple devices so the person setting up the rules needs to understand the relationship between databases, networks, web servers, load balancers, firewalls, AD, etc.... The biggest problem I've seen is training. Companies will purchase a nice vehicle to move a company forward and then won't pay to teach one of two employees how to drive it. Then when it crashes, blame the IT group.

Even if the SIEM is just capturing the data, a company has made progress. The forensic and troubleshooting capabilities are significant. There have been several times when I've solved issues by going to an "unused SIEM" or logging device. For what to correlate, the SANS Institute has written several papers on what to look for.

Jeff Jones
Abacus Solutions


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