Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Comments
How I Secure My Personal Cloud
Threaded  |  Newest First  |  Oldest First
Laurianne
50%
50%
Laurianne,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/24/2014 | 12:13:04 PM
What about Dropbox?
Thanks for the ideas Bill. What are your best practices re storing data in a service like Dropbox?
Bill Kleyman
50%
50%
Bill Kleyman,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/24/2014 | 12:18:16 PM
Re: What about Dropbox?
@Laurianne - Excellent question, and the answer sort of depends. If you're using it for personal use, always... ALWAYS, be aware of the sync settings of your Dropbox account. Many time if you install the client on a machine, you don't take the time to actually check what gets synchronized to that machine. 

I've seen folks load personal data onto public computers or load information onto machines that were infected. Additional recommendations revolve around limiting Dropbox use on unknown or even public WiFi spots. 

If you work in a compliance or regulatory shop - services like Dropbox will pretty much be stopped at the border. I like Dropbox and use it for personal use. However, I'm careful with what I upload to my account and what I synchronize.

Another good tip is to periodically check all of your "shared" folders or links. In many cases, lots of those shared links are old and no longer necessary. 
Marilyn Cohodas
50%
50%
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
2/24/2014 | 12:36:16 PM
Where are you on the continuum
Bill, Curious to know where you would put yourself on the security continuum with respect to your peers in IT. Is what you do to secure your personal cloud fairly typical and what you would recommend for anyone looking to lock down their professional work and workload? It seems to me that the idea of fooling around with SDN on a home network would be quite a stretch for even the saviest security practitioners!
Bill Kleyman
50%
50%
Bill Kleyman,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/24/2014 | 1:03:26 PM
Re: Where are you on the continuum
@Marilyn - SDN might be a stretch, you're right. As might be deploying hypervisor-layer security.

However, even on the consumer-side there are some pretty great security platforms. Let's take a couple of examples: NetGear Nighthawk AC1900 and the Asus RT-N66U Dark Knight. Both top of the line consumer routers - both capable of some advanced security - both under $200. Even without loading a mod firmware on these routers, the native software is very powerful. You can create ACLs, configure RADIUS servers, create LAN/wLAN MAC filters, easily setup your own VPN server, and even create network services filters using an advanced firewall.

These interfaces are pretty easy to navigate through and most have very good explanations built right into the GUI. So, good security doesn't have to be limited to the IT elite. In fact, these types of solutions and devices are here to make security much more accessible to the typical end-user.  
Marilyn Cohodas
50%
50%
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
2/25/2014 | 9:17:11 AM
Re: Where are you on the continuum
Even those high-end routers seem beyond my capabilities as a user/consumer (Maybe you can create ACLs, configure RADIUS servers, create LAN/wLAN MAC filters, easily setup your own VPN server, and even create network services filters using an advanced firewall -- but know I can't).

But in terms of power users and a security-aware (maybe not elite)  IT professional how much of what you practice would you recommend as a priority for others?

 
Bill Kleyman
50%
50%
Bill Kleyman,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/25/2014 | 10:38:49 AM
Re: Where are you on the continuum
There are a few things you can do to keep your cloud and data safe -- at a high level:

1. Constant vigilance. Never be complacent around your own security. If you're unsure about a piece of informaiton, a site, or an access point - don't go near it.

2. Keep you software (and firmware) updated. This goes for AV software as well as your router firmware.

3. Browse smart. Be aware of where you are both physically and in the cloud. Don't go to banking or other sites that contain your information from a public spot. Many times there may be someone snooping on that connection.

4. Keep track of your data. The good thing about cloud is that you can really efficiently expand your data footprint to more easily access infomration. This can also be bad thing. Programs like Dropbox allow you to share links -- but don't really remind you that you have shared links open. Keep track of where you store data both physically as well as in the cloud.

5. Be aware of passwords. First of all - please don't make your password something silly. Use good alphanumeric protocols and even throw in a special character in there. I am NOT a big fan of allowing browsers to save my passwords for me. 

6. Don't install, download or open data that you're unsure about. In a previous life - I did some security pen testing for large organizations. One of those projects included dropping an 8GB USB key in the middle of a busy hallway in the hopes that someone would pop it into their computer. We dropped 10 USB keys that had a hidden piece of software that would run as soon as the drive was plugged in. We had an 80% success rate. This holds true for downloading content you're unsure of or opening an email with a strange attachment. If it looks fake or strange -- it probably is.


Commentary
Ransomware Is Not the Problem
Adam Shostack, Consultant, Entrepreneur, Technologist, Game Designer,  6/9/2021
Edge-DRsplash-11-edge-ask-the-experts
How Can I Test the Security of My Home-Office Employees' Routers?
John Bock, Senior Research Scientist,  6/7/2021
News
New Ransomware Group Claiming Connection to REvil Gang Surfaces
Jai Vijayan, Contributing Writer,  6/10/2021
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Write a Caption, Win an Amazon Gift Card! Click Here
Latest Comment: Google's new See No Evil policy......
Current Issue
The State of Cybersecurity Incident Response
In this report learn how enterprises are building their incident response teams and processes, how they research potential compromises, how they respond to new breaches, and what tools and processes they use to remediate problems and improve their cyber defenses for the future.
Flash Poll
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-20466
PUBLISHED: 2021-06-21
White Shark System (WSS) 1.3.2 is vulnerable to unauthorized access via user_edit_password.php, remote attackers can modify the password of any user.
CVE-2020-20467
PUBLISHED: 2021-06-21
White Shark System (WSS) 1.3.2 is vulnerable to sensitive information disclosure via default_task_add.php, remote attackers can exploit the vulnerability to create a task.
CVE-2020-20468
PUBLISHED: 2021-06-21
White Shark System (WSS) 1.3.2 is vulnerable to CSRF. Attackers can use the user_edit_password.php file to modify the user password.
CVE-2021-24368
PUBLISHED: 2021-06-20
The Quiz And Survey Master – Best Quiz, Exam and Survey Plugin WordPress plugin before 7.1.18 did not sanitise or escape its result_id parameter when displaying an existing quiz result page, leading to a reflected Cross-Site Scripting issue. This c...
CVE-2021-31664
PUBLISHED: 2021-06-18
RIOT-OS 2021.01 before commit 44741ff99f7a71df45420635b238b9c22093647a contains a buffer overflow which could allow attackers to obtain sensitive information.