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3 Web Security Takeaways From Wikipedia's Near Miss
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Marilyn Cohodas
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
2/14/2014 | 9:42:37 AM
Re: How did you find the vulnerability
Thse of us in the realm you protect, salute you (and others) for your work! Definitely a growing and important field. 
shahartal
shahartal,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/14/2014 | 3:33:37 AM
Re: How did you find the vulnerability
These was no external activity to prompt the investigation. We regularly identify popular platforms and perform research in order to expose vulnerabilities that might harm all kinds of users. We're no 'protectors of the realm' but we do our best to help secure the Internet.
Marilyn Cohodas
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
2/13/2014 | 4:48:02 PM
How did you find the vulnerability
Shahar, Were you looking for something specific, or did some activity the investigation? 
shahartal
shahartal,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/13/2014 | 1:58:31 AM
Re: Was anyone actually affected?
The WikiMedia foundation has stated that they found no evidence of a past attack exploiting that vulnerability. Of course, the first thing a clever attacker would do is clean the logs. As for other web sites, I don't know of any other case yet, but as the exploit has been made public on exploit repositories, it's a matter of finding the unprotected ones and simply running a script.
jagibbons
jagibbons,
User Rank: Strategist
2/12/2014 | 9:56:26 PM
Re: Was anyone actually affected?
The false sense of security around the oldie but goodie attack vectors is a very real issue. In the quest to protect against the newest threats, we don't always think about the older variants that are still out there. Security teams can't take anything for granted. Continually test and verify that systems are protected as best as they can be.
Thomas Claburn
Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Ninja
2/12/2014 | 7:05:54 PM
Was anyone actually affected?
Did anyone get hacked as a result of this flaw or is that still to come if sites don't patch quickly enough?


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