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Target Breach: Why Smartcards Wont Stop Hackers
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jagibbons
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jagibbons,
User Rank: Strategist
1/26/2014 | 8:55:37 AM
Re: Smart cards won't stop hackers - but they remove the incentive
Online fraud typically only includes the primary account number and the CVV code. However, one-time use credit cards can resolve that issue. Moving to EMV for card-present payments and bank-supported disposable one-time use card numbers for online purchases may combine to be the safest solution.
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
1/27/2014 | 10:24:17 AM
Re: Smart cards won't stop hackers - but they remove the incentive
@jagibbons. I don't think I'm familiar with the one-time use credit cards you refer to. How prevalent are they and who issues them? Banks, retailers or both. 
jagibbons
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jagibbons,
User Rank: Strategist
1/27/2014 | 10:33:33 AM
Re: Smart cards won't stop hackers - but they remove the incentive
Our bank, Huntington, provides them. They are actually debit cards connected to a checking account. We can use it once or multiple times. It is possible to get new ones. Some of card brands also offer this service.

It's not a big issue if the card number is invalidated after the transaction when it is skimmed.
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
1/27/2014 | 3:50:26 PM
Re: Smart cards won't stop hackers - but they remove the incentive
Thanks, @jagibbons. Sounds like a reasonable option, though I think a better solution would be for the retail industry needs to be pushed to make more of an investment in smart cards and smart POS terminals.
jagibbons
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jagibbons,
User Rank: Strategist
1/27/2014 | 9:10:05 PM
Re: Smart cards won't stop hackers - but they remove the incentive
The disposable card numbers are really only for online use. You are correct, though, that the retail industry needs better POS security and protection.
MarkS229
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MarkS229,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/27/2014 | 9:21:36 PM
Smartcards are unnecessary. This is the Solution
Since this is the only solution guaranteed to solve the credit card/retailer problem, without causing major system redesigns and disruptions, I'll explain it in detail.

First, the credit card companies give everyone a UserID, which gets put on the credit card, instead of the number.

Next, everyone chooses a keyword, like 'NeimanMarcus' or 'Target' (too soon?).

The POS system connects to the credit card company, as usual but, instead of prompting for a password, it displays a matrix of upper/lowercase alphabets, with a random pattern of 1's and 0's underneath.

The user types the 1's and 0's corresponding to his keyword, which goes to the credit card company for approval. After limit checks, expiry checks etc, the user is approved.

The next time the user makes a purchase, the pattern of 1's and 0's is completely different, so the previously typed code is useless to an attacker. Doesn't matter whether it's malware, network snoopers, or spy cameras, the information is always useless.

For obvious reasons, anything in the retailer's logs is also totally useless.

Now, isn't that easier than redesigning the whole system, adding encryption and buying EMV cards?
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
1/28/2014 | 11:36:56 AM
Re: Smartcards are unnecessary. This is the Solution
Not prepared to conceded that smart cards are unncessary. In fact I was gratified to read in a Dallas business news story that Wal-Mart and Kroger already have checkout systems that work with smart cards that are widely used internationally. Too bad Target customers didn't have that option. I don't suspect too many Wal-Mart or Kroger shoppers do either. 
Lorna Garey
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Lorna Garey,
User Rank: Ninja
1/28/2014 | 12:04:20 PM
Re: Smartcards are unnecessary. This is the Solution
One problem is that the share of purchases made in person with the card in hand is shrinking, or at least coming even with ecommerce. Maybe one answer will incorporate smartphones -- a two-factor method, something you have (the chipped card) and something you know (a one-time-use code sent to your phone to verify the purchase).

However, let's remember that the card issuers really, really want to end fraud because they're the ones on the hook. Meanwhile, as a customer, what's the worst that happens if someone in Russia buys an Olympic tee shirt with my card? I call the issuer to have it removed. So, customers won't tolerate inconvenience; there's no percentage in it.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
1/30/2014 | 11:45:56 PM
EMV
Another problem with the security of EMV chips is that banks/credit card companies are so delusionally convinced that EMV is imperviously secure that when theft and fraud have occurred, they have given customers who have suffered from ID theft very difficult times, refusing to accept that the fraud occurred without exceptional evidence.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
1/30/2014 | 11:48:25 PM
Re: Smartcards are unnecessary. This is the Solution
This is why I try to pay with cash whenever possible.  So much easier, so much more secure.  (Indeed, the one time I went shopping at a Target during the affected period, I paid with cash; I'm now VERY glad that I did.)
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