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Future Shock: The Internet of Compromised Things
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MartinL923
MartinL923,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/24/2014 | 4:47:48 AM
Re: Dangerous appliances
Quite right! My toaster burnt my toast this morning, probably out of spite. However, my current toaster is entirely mechanical. As the price of computing power keeps dropping computers are finding their way into even the smallest device. Experience tells us that where you have software, you have bugs which can frequently be exploited. Lurking in a cupboard I have a mechanical telephone, its laughable to imagine that this device could contain malware, yet I now have a smart phone on which I can install all sorts of dubious software if I so wish, or if I don't pay attention. With the current pace of technology, I'll be willing to bet that within a few years there will be a smart-toaster in every kitchen.

Martin
seppleyt5j01
seppleyt5j01,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/23/2014 | 5:47:59 PM
Compimise your services?
Let's suppose for a moment that you live in Phoenix. It's July and  109 degrees outside. As a purveyor of ransomeware, I would shut off your refrigerator and air conditioning. I would only require that you pay me $100 in order to restore their services...
cbabcock
cbabcock,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/23/2014 | 5:27:57 PM
Hacker: Good afernoon, sir, is your house empty now?
In addition to fearing that hackers will learn my milk is out of date, I would hate for intruders to snoop on our local area network to learn, for marketing purposes or worse, what my family's habits were or when the house was empty. If all the home appliances were on a household network, a great deal of information would become available to hackers, the public utility, the appliance dealership. Martin Lee is right. We don't quite realize what we're getting into here.   
Shane M. O'Neill
Shane M. O'Neill,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/23/2014 | 4:54:35 PM
Re: Dangerous appliances
I don't think the Internet of Things movement will play out for consumers for awhile. Seems more of an enterprise/manufacturing/supply chain technology for the time being. But when it does eventually come to kitchens and living rooms, will we rely on Symantec, McAfee and Kaspersky to provide protection software for our refrigerators like we do for PCs? The use of third-party anti-virus software in IoT home situations didn't come up in the article so I was curious.
Marilyn Cohodas
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
1/23/2014 | 4:30:41 PM
Re: Dangerous appliances
Sounds like an idea for a sequel to Disney's classic, The Brave Little Toaster. 

 

 
SteveC227
SteveC227,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/23/2014 | 2:16:48 PM
Dangerous appliances
I have long suspected my toaster of plotting against me. Sometimes it fails to make the toast pop up in the hopes that I will stick a fork in the slot and get electrocuted. These days you have to work hard to keep one step ahead of your electrical appliances. I have never worried about my refrigerator, however. But now I am going to monitor it more carefully. Thank your for alerting us all to these threats.
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