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Target Mocks, Not Helps, Its Data Breach Victims
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Thomas Claburn
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Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Ninja
1/22/2014 | 4:46:28 PM
Credit monitoring
The whole notion of credit monitoring as a service is offensive because it shifts responsibility for data integrity from the data gather to the consumer. If you're going to compile data, you should be obligated to maintain it and represent it accurately.
dak3
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dak3,
User Rank: Moderator
1/22/2014 | 5:16:25 PM
Re: Credit monitoring
In fact, Target has already offered all of its customers a year of free credit monitoring. And I, for one, applaud their action in attempting to help educate the vast number of consumers who have no clue about security - how can that be a bad thing?
Kristin Burnham
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Kristin Burnham,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/22/2014 | 7:53:14 PM
Ideas?
Readers -- what would you have rather seen Target do?
Mathew
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Mathew,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/23/2014 | 5:31:12 AM
Re: Credit monitoring
Agreed. Even better would be allowing data breach victims to bill the offending party -- at a suitably high hourly rate -- for the time that they (or better, a designated third party) have to spend cleaning up the mess. 

ID theft monitoring is watching for criminals putting your stolen card details to use. Had the breached business properly safeguarded that information, customers wouldn't be stuck with having to watch for fraud -- through no fault of their own.

And it's a reminder to never, ever use a debit card except in an ATM, if you can help it.
Marilyn Cohodas
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Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
1/23/2014 | 8:45:41 AM
Re: Credit monitoring
There is nothing wrong with Target educating users about best security security practices. But how about Target educating retailers about the lessons they learned about how they got hacked in the first place. That would require a level of transparency that is rare in the industry.
BobH088
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BobH088,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/23/2014 | 9:29:11 AM
data loss solution
One of the most common causes of data getting in the wrong hands is the loss of mobile devices that often contain a frightening amount of private information. I want to share a protection option that worked for me. Tracer tags let someone who finds your lost stuff contact you directly without exposing your private information.  I use them on almost everything I take when I travel after one of the tags was responsible for getting my lost laptop returned to me in Rome one time. You can get them at mystufflostandfound.com
RobPreston
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RobPreston,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/23/2014 | 9:42:04 AM
Re: Credit monitoring
Security education is all well and good -- to argue against it is like arguing against teaching kids math and science. But it misses the point here. Target needs to take full responsibility for the breach and ensure that it will never happen again -- through better technology, practices...and customer, partner, and employee education. Spare us the PR campaign. 
Drew Conry-Murray
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Drew Conry-Murray,
User Rank: Ninja
1/23/2014 | 10:03:50 AM
Re: Credit monitoring
I shopped at Target during the period of the breach, and my bank issued me a new card. I was thinking of taking up Target on its offer of the free credit monitoring, but I was just looking at the site and saw that I need to give Experian (the company that will monitor my credit) with my social security number. That bothers me, because I don't really trust Experian to keep my information safe.

Just curious to get some opinions on whether the credit monitoring is worth it in exchange for my SS#.
Marilyn Cohodas
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50%
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
1/23/2014 | 12:18:50 PM
Re: Credit monitoring
Well based on what Brian Krebs reported last fall -- that  an identity theft service that sold SS and drivers license numbers purchased much of its data from Experian -- I wouldn't be too eager to share that information. 
JBonfield
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JBonfield,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/23/2014 | 1:25:11 PM
Target Info Breach- Target not helping anyone but themselves
Our accounts are affected, our lives turned upside down for various amounts of time (week, month, months, year) depending on the situation. For me, it was two weeks of being inconvenienced, and now another two weeks of my bills being held up and held back, and eventually an onslaught of bil payments ripping through my account. I get to live on peanuts for the next week, which would not have been the case had my account not been compromised.

What do we get for the lack of security on behalf of Target? We get a free year of credit monitoring. What does this include? NOTHING other than being able to see what is already happened, and how it affects your credit.

In order to get credit reports along with the monitoring or any kind of real service out of the deal, you have to submit a credit card and pay!

Isnt that what got us in this mess in the first place?

I personally agree with some of the states that are filing class-action suits against Target on this issue. I am praying that my own state does as well, or there is some way for me to be included in any of the other ones.

I have sworn off Target for the time being. I do not forsee my shopping there anytime soon. I have plenty of other stores to go to where my information was not breached.

Thanks Target!

Jonie Bonfield, Madison, WI
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