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Target Malware Origin Details Emerge
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missmuffin
missmuffin,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/12/2014 | 12:27:16 PM
Re: Via FTP to Russia
Preach it, brother!  You are right on (...err...) target!
WillyWonka
WillyWonka,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/20/2014 | 12:50:35 PM
How was Target breached?
"After somehow hacking into Target and infecting POS terminals with Kaptoxa..." - this is a very important piece of the puzzle. Does anyone know details on how the hackers breached the perimeter to get the malware onto the POS systems?

 

Thx
moarsauce123
moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
1/19/2014 | 8:35:43 AM
Via FTP to Russia
At what point did Target IT think that allowing any data to go outside its own network is ever needed except for very few gateways to payment processors? And at what point did Target IT think that transferring anything via FTP from secured networks is ever a good idea or needed? Was there ever a review of what data came from where and went to where on a regular (means daily) basis?

At the point the ports were opened (if they were closed to begin with) and at latest when the transfer started all alarms should have rung at the top brass IT offices. It is easy to blame the handful of criminals who surely are culprits, but the grossly negligent indifference of Target IT is as bad. Does anyone investigate those fools?

It is sad when the local store security is better than the network security at corporate. Stealing millions of CC numbers is apparently easier than shoplifting a pack of gum.


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