Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Comments
Target Breach: 8 Facts On Memory-Scraping Malware
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
MarkSitkowski
50%
50%
MarkSitkowski,
User Rank: Moderator
1/16/2014 | 6:28:29 PM
Target Breach
I posted this against another article, but I think it's important enough to repeat here.

Before the hackers damage another retailer, let me suggest a way of preventing this happening again. The benefit of this solution, originall designed for internet purchasing, is that it saves the credit card companies from having to invest in expensive EMV cards and, as a side benefit, a lost or stolen card will be useless to the thief. Also, very little modification needs to be made to the POS terminal. Further, the customer never sends his credit card details to the retailer, and the retailer's transaction records contain no usable information.
1. Remove all data from the credit card and its magnetic stripe, except for a simple User ID and, perhaps, the expiry date.
2. The credit card company installs a fraudproof authentication system, as described in www.designsim.com.au/What_is_SteelPlatez.ppsx, in its data centre.
3. The customer and retailer have accounts on the authentication system.
4. When the customer needs to make a purchase, he logs in to the authentication system belonging to the appropriate credit card company, giving his user ID and the amount of the purchase.
5. The retailer also logs in to the system, giving his merchant number, or User ID, and the customer's User ID (taken from the POS in use)
6. The credit card company knows the user's card number, so if he's been authenticated, it checks for a match with the retailer's submission.
7. If there's a match, it performs the usual checks for limits, expiry etc, issues an approval, pays the retailer etc.
Simple
PaulS681
50%
50%
PaulS681,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/15/2014 | 7:30:13 PM
Re: Another reason...
 

Interesting concept. Paying with cash would make these POS machines obsolete however hackers would probably focus their efforts on financial institutions and hack you that way. I say that in jest as cards are not going away anytime soon but you make a good point.
Mathew
50%
50%
Mathew,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/15/2014 | 7:11:53 AM
Re: Another reason...
Indeed. The convenience factor of using a debit/credit card would also be offset by having to carefully review one's statement online every 24-48 hours for signs of abuse.
Thomas Claburn
50%
50%
Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Ninja
1/14/2014 | 8:18:24 PM
Another reason...
...to pay with cash. I wonder what the relative risk of being robbed is compared to the risk of being hacked.


Edge-DRsplash-10-edge-articles
I Smell a RAT! New Cybersecurity Threats for the Crypto Industry
David Trepp, Partner, IT Assurance with accounting and advisory firm BPM LLP,  7/9/2021
News
Attacks on Kaseya Servers Led to Ransomware in Less Than 2 Hours
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  7/7/2021
Commentary
It's in the Game (but It Shouldn't Be)
Tal Memran, Cybersecurity Expert, CYE,  7/9/2021
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
The State of Cybersecurity Incident Response
In this report learn how enterprises are building their incident response teams and processes, how they research potential compromises, how they respond to new breaches, and what tools and processes they use to remediate problems and improve their cyber defenses for the future.
Flash Poll
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2021-32066
PUBLISHED: 2021-08-01
An issue was discovered in Ruby through 2.6.7, 2.7.x through 2.7.3, and 3.x through 3.0.1. Net::IMAP does not raise an exception when StartTLS fails with an an unknown response, which might allow man-in-the-middle attackers to bypass the TLS protections by leveraging a network position between the c...
CVE-2021-37759
PUBLISHED: 2021-07-31
A Session ID leak in the DEBUG log file in Graylog before 4.1.2 allows attackers to escalate privileges (to the access level of the leaked session ID).
CVE-2021-37760
PUBLISHED: 2021-07-31
A Session ID leak in the audit log in Graylog before 4.1.2 allows attackers to escalate privileges (to the access level of the leaked session ID).
CVE-2020-26564
PUBLISHED: 2021-07-31
ObjectPlanet Opinio before 7.15 allows XXE attacks via three steps: modify a .css file to have <!ENTITY content, create a .xml file for a generic survey template (containing a link to this .css file), and import this .xml file at the survey/admin/folderSurvey.do?action=viewImportSurvey['importFil...
CVE-2020-26565
PUBLISHED: 2021-07-31
ObjectPlanet Opinio before 7.14 allows Expression Language Injection via the admin/permissionList.do from parameter. This can be used to retrieve possibly sensitive serverInfo data.