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NSA Fallout: Microsoft Rethinks Customer Data Controls
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DSusan2013
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DSusan2013,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/5/2013 | 11:45:30 AM
NSA Proof Communication
It is important that more and more software companies protect our data. I am glad to see microsoft try and help protect there useres. It is also nice to see the new apps coming out that are NSA proof for communication. The one I have been using is Jolt, fee free to check it out if you wish. More security and privacy is always a good thing :)

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.abmapp.jolt
pjmjr
50%
50%
pjmjr,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/6/2013 | 1:52:14 PM
Re: NSA Proof Communication
This shows the hyprocacy of Microsoft's"scruggoled" campaign. Not only do they use user data to make Bing work, they have worked hand in glove with NSA to provide access to private communications and data. Now they try to tell us they are rethinking issues of data privacy. I remember all their promices about how wonderful Windows 7, Vista, and 8 were going to be.
anon4701114258
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0%
anon4701114258,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/5/2013 | 11:54:25 AM
I can smell the pile
BS. MS is in bed with the NSA. Same with Google, Twitter, Facebook, Yahoo, and the list goes on.
danielcawrey
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50%
danielcawrey,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/5/2013 | 1:06:02 PM
Re: I can smell the pile
The fact that Microsoft has to fight our own government for privacy seems so ridiculous. This technological arms war almost seems like a waste of money.

But then again, who knows what kinds of new privacy tech may come out of efforts like this?
TwistOneUp
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50%
TwistOneUp,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/5/2013 | 4:18:14 PM
Re: I can smell the pile
not all services give it up to the NSA.

social networking org Glom.com does not comply with any NSA, PRISM, or other government demands for people's data, no do they sell people's data, track searches, chats, messaging, etc.

i find it the height of hypocrisy that Microsoft, who at one time allegedly worked with the government to help them read outlook emails, now decides to work on "better privacy".  good luck with that.

can you say, "did a 180"?

TOU
Thomas Claburn
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50%
Thomas Claburn,
User Rank: Ninja
12/5/2013 | 6:43:11 PM
Re: I can smell the pile
The problem with any pronouncement about encryption is that is has to be taken on trust, something that has already been violated. How does anyone know the encryption Microsoft (or Google or Apple) provides will function as desired? Very few computer users are technically savvy enough to really understand and evaluate encryption. Unless there are specific laws preventing the NSA (not to mention Russia and China) from accessing data, expect it to try and ulitmately succeed. It has billions in funding and skilled experts. You have assurances but no real proof.
koconnor100
50%
50%
koconnor100,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/5/2013 | 3:05:40 PM
meaningless
Legally required by US Law to submit all data to NSA , and then legally required not to reveil that they're doing it , or they all get thrown in jail.


This is just shuffling deck chairs on the titanic.

The FBI kicked the door in of the email provider Edward Snowden was using and took what they wanted by force , and anyone who resisted was threatenned with jail time. You think promises of encryption mean anything ?

 

The only thing left is to wait for them to release the code to "prove" there are no back doors, and then find out it doesn't match up with the code that's actually out there.

 

 


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