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Weighing Costs Vs. Benefits Of NSA Surveillance
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anon3070614879
50%
50%
anon3070614879,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/4/2013 | 5:53:39 PM
Re: Numbers
I like the analogy of the automobile.  Americans accept that risk.  However, the NSA and its defenders don't spend a lot of time terrorizing us with the high number of car accidents.  They do cry 9/11 regularly.  Americans have to get their fear under control before they make a decision about what kind of surveillance they are willing to put up with.

 

Canada did not experience a 9/11-style terror attack, but for this Canadian, the current surveillance disclosures are terrifying.  I am an enthusiastic online shopper and I bank online.  That secret government agents have the ability to hack my financial information leaves me scrambling to come up with ways I might protect that information.  I can't do that.  Only legislation can protect me.

 

I am happy to see that the UN is at least eager to investigate the global surveillance scandal.  It's through the UN that we made an international law that makes war a crime.  Why can't we make unwarranted spying an international crime, subject to sanctions.  It's not gonna stop a state like the US, which makes war whenever it pleases and will continue spying, but if enough countries get angry enough, we can at least target America's reputation.
Marilyn Cohodas
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50%
Marilyn Cohodas,
User Rank: Strategist
12/3/2013 | 4:41:17 PM
Re: Numbers -- terrorists have not won!
No, the terrorists have not won. And yes, we -- as individuals and as part of the tech industry -- have to be vigilant to make sure that our government doesn't overreach.  Where that line is? I'm not sure. But I'm encouraged by the passionate discourse about the risk/versus rewards of the NSA programs, which I might add, are being conducted here, in a very public forum!
anon2122209927
50%
50%
anon2122209927,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/3/2013 | 3:22:18 PM
Re: Numbers
i couldnt agree more. Last week I attneded my granddaughters Turkey trot at her middle school. When I got there, I had to sign in AND leav my drivers license with them, just to get on the play ground to watch them run. Then, when they did run, they ran around the playground outside the fence to the front of the school, returning to the playground. What was the point of leaving the id? All terrorists have won.... and we are now all slaves to survallence and being spyed on.
RobPreston
50%
50%
RobPreston,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/3/2013 | 1:44:03 PM
Re: Numbers
Of course, we already make some risk tradeoffs when it comes to terrorism. We're not shutting our airports and closing our borders. The question is where the line is.

And the "numbers" don't reflect intent. It's one thing for automobiles to cause many thousands of deaths, but those deaths (for the most part) aren't intentional. Terrorism is intentional. And if we allow a certain amount of it as part of a risk-based calculation, expect to get even more of it. 
moarsauce123
50%
50%
moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
12/3/2013 | 1:18:18 PM
Numbers
Be very frank here, how many deaths to guns and booze every year? 9/11's multiple times over. Cost to our economy running around scared? TRILLIONS. Terrorists already won.

 

We've imploded.

 

Remove emotion, it's all about the numbers.

 

Carry on.


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