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NSA Vs. Your Smartphone: 5 Facts
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Laurianne
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Laurianne,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/11/2013 | 7:25:51 PM
re: NSA Vs. Your Smartphone: 5 Facts
Mat, any thoughts on how the new iOS will fit in here? Does the location data remain hard to retrieve?
Cara Latham
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Cara Latham,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/11/2013 | 7:52:14 PM
re: NSA Vs. Your Smartphone: 5 Facts
This seems to me like a blatant disregard of any privacy whatsoever. Essentially, regardless of what consumers do to protect themselves, the NSA will always find a way to gain access to their data, and that is scary.
Mathew
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Mathew,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/12/2013 | 10:16:05 AM
re: NSA Vs. Your Smartphone: 5 Facts
Great question. I haven't gotten my hands on iOS 7 but am running this down.
TerryB
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TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
9/12/2013 | 5:48:08 PM
re: NSA Vs. Your Smartphone: 5 Facts
Why is that scary to ordinary people, Cara? I've always wondered what people are thinking when they make those comments. Are ordinary people scared the NSA will intercept plans with your friends for golf and steal your tee time?
I understand the theoretical arguments about right to privacy supposedly guaranteed by our constitution and don't necessarily disagree with those. But scared of NSA in my boring mid-western life? Nope.
What scares me is the total dysfunction of government in general. That seems to get worse every year, no matter what your political leanings are. :-)
TerryB
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50%
TerryB,
User Rank: Ninja
12/17/2013 | 10:13:33 AM
re: NSA Vs. Your Smartphone: 5 Facts
Now who is naive? Or at least clueless on legal issues. You really think that would be evidence beyond reasonable doubt? Especially since my car would have no physical evidence of any accident. Besides, I don't text and drive, rarely even carry my smartphone with me unless traveling.

Your comment is the kind mindless fear mongering I'm talking about. What makes you think they wouldn't have satellite images of the accident anyway? Or street cameras? I think going to cell logs is the last thing you have to worry about.

One last point, maybe you should research what the NSA does. Investigating crime, even murder, is not their function. Do you have evidence the local police can subpoena these records for crime investigations? Of course you don't, because you can't do it. You do understand what "classified" access is, right?

All this said, as I clearly said in my first post, I don't think this is constitutional. And on news last night the first judge agrees with that stance. We'll see how appeals process plays out.

My point stands, unless you truely are a terrorist, or hang out with them, the NSA is nothing that should concern you.


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