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Amazon Silk Browser Prompts Privacy Worries
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jcox617
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jcox617,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/1/2011 | 4:42:53 PM
re: Amazon Silk Browser Prompts Privacy Worries
Test
darkmatter
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darkmatter,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/30/2011 | 3:17:41 PM
re: Amazon Silk Browser Prompts Privacy Worries
This is the best intelligence device ever developed to gather information on customers coupled with an efficient selling engine behind it. Amazon has developed a Trojan horse (not covered with wooden planks but nice silky fur) capable of identifying your habits, knowing your friends, understanding your quirks, satisfying most of your wishes and desires ... and a point-of-sales nearby you 24/7. What is better than Amazon Fire for a consumerist society? The Greeks gave the wooden horse free of charge to the Trojans. Amazon asks for $199. Too much?
jrapoza
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jrapoza,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/29/2011 | 8:56:08 PM
re: Amazon Silk Browser Prompts Privacy Worries
I agree with Brian. I'm almost less concerned with this then I am with how my ISP can track surfing data. I'm pretty sure I know how Amazon will use this data (to improve their own capability to sell stuff). With the ISPs, I'm less sure how they are using data and more concerned about what they are doing with it.

Jim Rapoza is an InformationWeek Contributing Editor
Bprince
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Bprince,
User Rank: Ninja
9/29/2011 | 8:22:28 PM
re: Amazon Silk Browser Prompts Privacy Worries
From the perspective of developing intelligence on customers, this sounds fine. But I think they should be clear on how long they retain data and what type of data they retain so people can make a decision about privacy based on all the facts.
Brian Prince, InformationWeek contributor


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