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10 Top Password Managers
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lspielman916
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lspielman916,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/1/2013 | 7:57:34 PM
re: 10 Top Password Managers
I have been a RoboForm user for about 7 years. I LOVE IT! No, I do not work for the company. Am a paid subscriber. Couldn't live without it.

One thing that the article left off was that for at least the last year+ they store everything in the cloud! I have multiple computers and do a lot of global travel. As soon as I use one of my other computers/tablets/smartphones, after I sign in to RoboForm, ALL of my data is synchronized. Yes, I do use a double lock.
JM
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JM,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/1/2013 | 7:26:06 PM
re: 10 Top Password Managers
I have used KeePass for years and consider it the best of the lot for several reasons.

1. You make it sound like open source is bad. In fact, it is extremely valuable. The code in KeePass enjoys a level of inspection and verification beyond any closed source program.

2. It stores an indexed database, where each entry can have any number of user defined fields. For example, for an entry for a credit card, in addition to the normal username, password, and URL info, I can store named-fields for any other data I want to store. For example, a credit card number field, a CVC field, a date field, a Name-as-on-card field, a phone number to call if it's lost field, and fields for the special answers to questions the web site asks me when I log in. This capability makes all the difference. I refuse to use a data storage app that canGt do this. It makes the app broadly useful for all sorts of data and makes it a truly effective system for storing data you want to keep private. There is only one place I ever go to, KeePass.

3. It uses a double lock - a file with a tons of random bits, plus the password you type in. I physically copy that file to each of my computers and my phone, so it never touches the internet or any cloud storage. To break in, not only would someone have to guess the password I type in, they'd also need that file.

4. It gives me total control over my data. It stores the data locally, not on the cloud. But I can store it in a dropbox folder if I want to, making it available on the cloud. All my choice. I personnaly have mine on dropbox so that my phone, mac, and pcGs are all synchronized automatically.

5. It works across multiple platforms. I have it working on a MAC, several PC's, my Android phone, and a friend uses it on Linux.

6. Your sentence saying it is lightweight and going on to say what it doesnGt do makes it sound like a bad thing and that it is missing something. In fact, all the things you mention represent a fabulous feature! You can stick the entire tiny program on a memory stick and run it on a machine without having to "install it" It doesn't require mucking up the windows registry etc. I can run it on a friendGs computer and the computer is clean when I'm done.

7. The GǣAutoTypeGǥ feature that fills in all the info required to log into a site works great. ItGs even programmable so that on complicated web sites that donGt use the standard username and password, but demand more things to be filled out, it can be easily programmed to do this job. ItGs simple enough, even my mother (in her 80Gs) has used this with no help from me!

8. It's F R E E !
ctcusick
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50%
ctcusick,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/1/2013 | 7:05:41 PM
re: 10 Top Password Managers
Yup, Keepass is the best. I knew of someone who once loaded his entire company's keepass database into a cloud service so he could access passwords remotely. What an amazing idiot. Cloud services are NOT secure. DO NOT sacrifice your computing security, your privacy and liberty, for the latest new wiz-bang technology gizmo or feature.

Did you know that most news website's 'comments' sections obtain one's Contact list (depending on if you log in with an integrated account from facebook, windows live, google, or similar)?

Why would you want corporations and others to know who you know, all so you can use a technology feature (in this example, leaving a comment on a website, such as a foxnewsdotcom online article, or similar)??
Buster57
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Buster57,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/1/2013 | 5:49:28 PM
re: 10 Top Password Managers
Keepass is easily the best password manager...and it's free!
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