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Email Without A Warrant? Senators Not Sold
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Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/29/2013 | 5:59:47 PM
re: Email Without A Warrant? Senators Not Sold
Well said. It's easy, as many have done, to decry the government as a prying monster that needs to be shrunk down. But this is too simplistic a view. There are instances in which public safety necessitates that personal assets - whether digital, like email, or physical, like a house - be available for law enforcement perusal. When there's a transparent protocol, I don't have a problem with local or federal authorities looking at online communications or searching private homes. But when there are only weak checks and balances governing how private data is accessed for investigations, that's a different matter. It's already difficult today, and as you point out, it will only become harder if lawmakers don't get with the program. Even if one trusts our current leaders to wield powers responsibly, some of the precedents that are being set demand debate, especially since they give more wiggle room than most people realize for future applications and expansions.
MyW0r1d
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MyW0r1d,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/29/2013 | 1:50:30 PM
re: Email Without A Warrant? Senators Not Sold
Sometimes our elected officials can still surprise us with a reasonable appreciation of digital privacy issues (albeit a little slow). You had me until the final four words "stored in the cloud." So does that mean any privately maintained or business accounts do not fall under this modification? Are they talking private, public, or hybrid cloud? Still seems a little vague to me and open to discussion.

In my humble opinion, an email (open or otherwise) should be seen or applied equally to laws which govern an envelope laying in a private house on a table. You still need a warrant to enter and search the house (secured by a locked door much the same as a password provides to your email). You have taken reasonable measures to safeguard it as opposed to leaving it in an open mailbox on your front porch or in front of your house. Even then, wasn't the contents of a mailbox not at one time considered covered by Federal Law Title 18, Sections 1705 and 1708, which made it a federal offense to tamper with or withdraw without proper search and seizure?

This however is only one aspect of the assault on privacy and personal liberty. Video surveillance is increasingly being hidden behind overriding security issues, GPS stalking through a guise of "social apps" (don't you feel left out if you don't participate), and making it economically rewarding to businesses to sell or trade your personal information obtained through a desire to take advantage of online purchase or at home delivery. I am certain it all sounds a little paranoic to some, but they are all building blocks to construct an unconscious forfeiture of basic constitutional rights.
Cara Latham
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Cara Latham,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/29/2013 | 12:58:15 PM
re: Email Without A Warrant? Senators Not Sold
It's good to see the Congress is finally stepping up to take on the issue of protecting citizens' online rights. In theory, I am not opposed to law enforcement's use or access of private email -- so long as there is a warrant and a justification for needing to access it. Similarly, I do not have a problem with law enforcement entering a person's home -- again, so long as there is a warrant and a justification for doing so. If lawmakers don't take action now to protect citizens, future technological advances will make protecting citizens' privacy even more difficult.
dbtinc
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dbtinc,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/27/2013 | 12:14:06 PM
re: Email Without A Warrant? Senators Not Sold
You are exactly correct. This is how the populace at large is entertained by such things as "gun control" while our basic rights are stripped away. Wake up and start to demand your right to privacy and being left the h+ll alone.
Steve Deraas
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Steve Deraas,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/27/2013 | 3:44:14 AM
re: Email Without A Warrant? Senators Not Sold
Well thought, out well articulated, and absolutely correct!
Michael Endler
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50%
Michael Endler,
User Rank: Apprentice
4/26/2013 | 11:42:11 PM
re: Email Without A Warrant? Senators Not Sold
It's good that there's FINALLY bipartisan opposition to warrantless email monitoring. It would be great if this attitude extended to a lot of other important issues. But the DOJ's stance toward cyberlaw has still been troubling.

Last month, the Justice Department finally acknowledged that aspects of U.S. email laws need to be changed-- but that hasn't stopped DOJ lawyers from exploiting the dodgier laws when they feel like they need to, or from attempting to bully hacktivists with punishments that are more about making an example of someone than about fitting the alleged crime. I'm not saying that the DOJ hasn't had legitimate reasons for exploiting these rules; if there's a clear and present danger to the public, for example, then there's plenty of room for debate. But precedents are being established while a lot of important debates (Congress members' relationship to insider trading rules is another) are silenced under the heading of "national security," making it difficult for responsible citizens to tell when certain ideals might need to be re-examined in light of current realities, or when "national security" is being used as a catch-all to accelerate an action or silence debate.

Technology moves fast and lawmakers can do only so much to keep pace, so some amount of discord is inevitable. But the implications of many of these laws are profound, and we're not having transparent conversations about how we define the rights they affect. If that doesn't seem like a problem today, think what it will be like 10 years from now, when sensors are embedded in everything, and when every minutiae of our day-to-day existence, from where we are to whom we're with to what our heart rate is at any given instant, is documented. These developments could change the world for the better, but they also raise foreseeable issues that we should really strive to get right in the first place. There are already connected pacemakers collecting data that is generated by the patient but to which the patient has no legal access or ownership. As this sort of personal data-collection proliferates into new forms, the issue of who owns and has access to your data will be an important topic.

It's amazing that something like gun show background checks gets so much mainstream play relative to conversations about online rights. That's not to say one thing or another about the Second Amendment, but if lobbyists and lawmakers are going to maintain that some rights are so sacrosanct that they must be interpreted as widely as possible, why is a reasonable discussion of online privacy (which, I suspect, many people would consider a clear Fourth Amendment issue) so much harder to sustain?


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