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Mandatory Car 'Black Boxes' Proposed: Privacy Questions
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PJS880
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PJS880,
User Rank: Ninja
12/24/2012 | 1:56:29 AM
re: Mandatory Car 'Black Boxes' Proposed: Privacy Questions
My suggestion gives consumers the choice to pick weather or not they choose to have a vehicle containing EDR's. I think that the information that individuals give our over normal internet usage, that in you vehicle seems a bit excessive and a bit on the border of invading your privacy. There are far better ways to collect data for vehicle safety purposes and this is not one of them.

Paul Sprague
InformationWeek Contributor
Mathew
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Mathew,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/19/2012 | 2:52:51 PM
re: Mandatory Car 'Black Boxes' Proposed: Privacy Questions
Some readers have asked how they can submit comments to the NHTSA about its proposal. The best approach is to read the notice of approved rulemaking, which spells out how to submit comments either online, or via mail, fax, or hand delivery.

If going the online route, visit regulations.gov and refer to docket number NHTSAG2012G0177. That said, it's worth reading the NHTSA's notice of proposed rulemaking first, as it provides a lot of very interesting detail about how/why the vehicle data would be collected, protected, and used.

--Mathew Schwartz
InformationWeek
Michael Endler
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Michael Endler,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/18/2012 | 6:49:45 PM
re: Mandatory Car 'Black Boxes' Proposed: Privacy Questions
I like the idea of aggregating the data anonymously as well. That suggestion, like the "meaningful use" framework, seems like a common-sense way for handling EDRs-- but given the state of our legislative process with respect to privacy and technology laws, I won't be surprised if the deployment of these devices gets murkier before it gets clearer.

-- Michael Endler, InformationWeek Associate Editor
Mathew
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Mathew,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/18/2012 | 5:30:42 PM
re: Mandatory Car 'Black Boxes' Proposed: Privacy Questions
Great observation, Nathan, thank you. Such a regulation would go a long way toward balancing research and privacy sides of this equation.
I wonder if there isn't some way that the data could also just be collected and shared with researchers anonymously? Akin to a computer or mobile app asking you if you'll share the data you're using anonymously, for research purposes. Maybe the data could be aggregated by dealers? It sounds like studying the information could lead to measurable safety improvements.
Mathew Schwartz
InformationWeek
NG11209
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NG11209,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/18/2012 | 3:03:52 PM
re: Mandatory Car 'Black Boxes' Proposed: Privacy Questions
An executive at an auto insurance claims software company told me earlier this year that there is a 66% probability that one of the cars in a given accident has an event data recorder installed already. The company has the ability to extract that data and turn it over to insurers and authorities for investigation, but there are still many legal challenges. Hopefully as these devices become mandatory the consumer will be remembered in developing a "meaningful use" framework G as with electronic health records.

Nathan Golia
Insurance & Technology


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