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Should You Buy From Huawei?
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vuil
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vuil,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/20/2012 | 7:14:22 PM
re: Should You Buy From Huawei?
"Craig is an internationally recognized expert on wireless communications and mobile computing technologies."

But not, as far as I can see, an expert on the internals of large telecommunication routers and switches and the possibility of Huawei and ZTE containing potential spying code. Of course, if you have a political inclination (and coming from MA I'd wager he favors the left side of the aisle) it never stops you from expressing your opinion on such technical matters.

After all the objective is to slag the House of Representatives rather than truly caring for the US as a sovereign nation. Any sensible person would err on the side of caution. After all these Chinese companies are not struggling for business.

Us, lesser beings, step aside on technical matters outside our direct experience. Not Craig who often spouts forth at conferences on everything with the gusto, often of the ignorant.

Guess you lefty poli-sci prof would be proud of you hey Craig.
moarsauce123
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moarsauce123,
User Rank: Ninja
10/19/2012 | 5:53:26 AM
re: Should You Buy From Huawei?
I think the devices should be avoided because they are of questionable quality running decades old code that does not jive with today's security standards. I think it is more a matter of cluelessness and carelessness than any malicious intent.
edarr432
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edarr432,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/18/2012 | 11:34:04 PM
re: Should You Buy From Huawei?
Craig you're trying very hard not to get it, but don't despair, Charlie doesn't get it either. The issue is security. While we might be able to find software hacks, we're not going to have the luxury of reverse engineering every piece of telecom hardware we buy from Chinese companies. There is a communist party committee in each of those companies. They can't refuse to do what that committee tells them. They play hardball.
dbartlett329
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dbartlett329,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/18/2012 | 5:11:39 PM
re: Should You Buy From Huawei?
Okay, all here understand the technology, but that is only the media. With ChinaGs (and others) past record of overt and covert behavior and their disdain for our people as a whole, why would we even consider continuing to allow suspect companies as these to operate inside our semi-secure architecture and play below our radar?
Craig Mathias
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Craig Mathias,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/17/2012 | 5:37:17 PM
re: Should You Buy From Huawei?
OK, I knew this would be controversial, but, as usual, the commentary is straying from the real issues at hand. The most important of these is whether the US government should be recommending against buying the products of a given firm based on allegations and innuendo. Again, the facts are lacking here, and I consider what Congress did too be very dangerous indeed. As I said, absolutely, the US government should buy American. It's hard to do in the case of cellular infrastructure, but I'm very sensitive to the issues here regardless. And at no time here have I recommended buying from Huawei or anyone else. If you don't want to buy from Huawei or anyone else based on, as I wrote, technical, business, or financial (or, really, any other) reasons, don't. But I view the slope as created by Congress as slippery and dangerous, highly political, provocative, and even naive and hypocritical.

And the whole issue is bigger still - see my blog at http://www.networkworld.com/co... for more.
TSRL
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TSRL,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/17/2012 | 4:18:46 PM
re: Should You Buy From Huawei?
Craig,

If you are convinced that Huawei are completely on the up-and-up, why don't you buy their equipment for your telcom and networking needs. After all, it is cheaper and that's what the bottom line is all about.

Having spent a significant amount of time in China and having dealt with their telcom folks I can tell you two things: life is cheap and all IP is the property of the government (including whatever IP they can "appropriate" from any other source). I will never deal with those folks again.
saburgan
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saburgan,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/17/2012 | 1:58:00 PM
re: Should You Buy From Huawei?
Craig, you silly guy. You have no clue.
ANON1255554460131
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ANON1255554460131,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/16/2012 | 11:25:33 PM
re: Should You Buy From Huawei?
I wonder what happen if all countries in the world do the same. The Chinese government forbid all American made software and hardware. India do the same so do all BRICK nations and every other country in the world. I wonder how does it affect global economy?
CLAFOUNTAIN100
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CLAFOUNTAIN100,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/16/2012 | 10:29:41 PM
re: Should You Buy From Huawei?
My analysis however, which looks at the core issue, is that the technology was originally developed by Chinese Nationals, for Chinese market. -The troubles with highly educated Chinese hardware and software developement teams likely is in finding qualified translators who can translate Chinese into English, and vise-versa.

Likely the answers being furnished are through the marketing department who markets and sells the product for use. -I have performed this work before, typically with companies in India. -

My main guess is that the report was created without a proper translation with the proper teams at huawei. -Translating English specifications to English (between multiple groups) and prioritization of software functions requires a team itself!

Cisco definitely seems to have trouble with this; their head engineers left to head their R&D departments. -It's great technology based on the white papers available online, and Cisco's cut backs in R&D over the years are showing. -Cisco acquired Scientific Atlanta, a set-top box manufacturer for cable. -They were recently sued by TiVo for infringing of patents AGAIN in the past 6 months. There's an article at Reuters, where Cisco then counter-sued for TiVo not marketing and making TiVo's patents available. Basically, Cisco outsourced R&D to an existing product line manufactured by a competitor, then sued for the right to market it. Pretty interesting R&D strategy!

If Cisco has issue with this, they should be on the same Industry Standards Committees and Groups as Huawei so they have a product that is compatible, ready for sale, and competitively priced.
CLAFOUNTAIN100
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CLAFOUNTAIN100,
User Rank: Apprentice
10/16/2012 | 10:24:02 PM
re: Should You Buy From Huawei?
Great insight, and I appreciate it.

In my estimation however, is that the hooks in the firmware were originally placed to fill a requirement, likely for foreign law. Think Patriot Act requirements or similar. Likely without the required additional hardware, which it seems your company didn't purchase, the software still functioned.

My guess again is that the Chinese software development team didn't acquire a full spec document which specifically requested removal of this functionality. Everyone remembers VISTA. It was slow because the kernel processed too much information; similar with Windows 98.

This happens from time to time. Hopefully that hardware wouldn't need to be purchased in a few years when Patriot Act is sunsetted; not renewed.
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