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Open Source Developers Still Not Interested in Secure Coding
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lancop
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lancop,
User Rank: Moderator
12/10/2020 | 6:12:57 PM
FOSS developers don't get paid for secure coding
This doesn't surprise me, as even full-time paid commercial programmers produce code that is riddled with security vulnerabilities and insecure coding practices. They are much more security conscious than FOSS programmers, but still not always at the security level that would be desired in organizations with serious data privacy concerns.

I don't expect this situation to change whatsoever, so I believe that the workaround is for security conscious users & organizations to assume that FOSS software is highly insecure and should only be run on untrusted PC's in untrusted network subnets. By this I mean that a computer network should be divided into isolated & firewalled subnets that are separated into high security (trusted), medium security (production), low security (untrusted) and public (totally untrusted) zones that never co-mingle their network traffic. That way security breaches in untrusted subnets are irrelevant to the organization because no valuable private information ever exists in them – they are only for public facing insecure tasks with no privacy value.

That, actually, makes sense for those of us embracing open source – why would we need data security privacy on a computer devoted to creating FOSS & FOSH content that we'll be donating to the global commons anyway? Sure, we might take basic security precautions, but nothing beyond that is worth our time & effort. Especially if the FOSS we're using is full of unpatched security holes anyway...


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