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DHS Shares Data on Top Cyber Threats to Federal Agencies
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tdsan
tdsan,
User Rank: Ninja
9/14/2020 | 5:03:36 PM
Re: hmmm
A backdoor, a cryptominer, and ransomware," he says.

Hmm, interesting, we were the ones who created ransomware and deployed it to other countries but it was not designed to be used for monetary purposes, it was called cryptoviral extortion. So let's be clear, we invented it - the question you have to ask yourself -  if it was created at Columbia University, how did it happen to appear from other nation-states radar and how is it that other countries are attacking us using our own software program. They reversed engineered it and sent it back to us. This also happened with Stuxnet and NitroZeus. 

But the conversation was not only just based on that, it also covered numerous programs that were getting out of hand, managed by people who got sloppy drunk over their power broker decisions. It never fails, General Alexander, Clapper, and now DHS's power-hungry leader. The funny thing is that they (Congress) tried to denounce Clapper and Alexander's decision but they were the one's who authorized it, basically to deploy and initiate cyber-warfare on nation-states (some of which were even our allies - France and England - they found us spying on prime-minister's cell phone and Video conferencing sessions, we found a way to hack their session, those video conferencing sessions were held on US soil - NY/US).
  • The concept of file-encrypting ransomware was invented and implemented by Young and Yung at Columbia University and was presented at the 1996 IEEE Security & Privacy conference. It is called cryptoviral extortion and it was inspired by the fictional face-hugger in the movie Alien.

It is funny how we act like the victim when we are the one's causing the problems, another instance of "chickens coming home to roost", for some reason, this sounds familiar.

T
mitchellwekey
mitchellwekey,
User Rank: Apprentice
7/21/2020 | 7:45:11 PM
hmmm
So no mentions on cryptocurrencies?
tdsan
tdsan,
User Rank: Ninja
7/16/2020 | 6:46:17 PM
Interested info about Einstein
Sounds good, but what they did not tell you is that there are different versions of Einstein I and II, I think there are more. This SIEM project was really part of the Prism program because of the egregious violations against US citizens. It was also part of the two other programs Trailblazer (failure after spending billions of dollars and Thin Thread created by William "Bill" Binney" who was the architect who would have caught the 911 bombing if they would have allowed him - 28 years at NSA as the leading technical director, actually they arrested him at gunpoint in his own house when he identified and brought the information to their attention).

It is interesting to see that they are sharing after years of asking for this (its about damn time - Labraun James). I am glad the regime has retired/gone and a new group of leaders is taking up the mantle with new ideas (i.e. Clapper and General Alexander https://www.cnet.com/news/nsa-surveillance-programs-prism-upstream-live-on-snowden/)

Anyway, thank you for sharing.

Todd


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