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Preventing PTSD and Burnout for Cybersecurity Professionals
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REISEN1955
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REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
9/16/2019 | 2:40:16 PM
PTSD is not correct here
Trauma neither - this is standard stress within the computer industry and all careers can have it from a help desk (problem and ticket overload) to server admins (nothing like a failed data center on a Friday) to ransomware across the entire firm.  Stress is common enough in life as it is.  My own qualification for PTSD is that my data center crashed down 103 floors in the south tower on September 11 and I was only 2 floors down from 103 and made it down to the ground and live.  THAT is PTSD my friends.  Plus I saw 3 people fall from the north tower and die.  That is a room I do not go into very often.  I want remain sane.  Every September 11 it hits me hard from 8:46 a.m. to 10:29.  Severe PTSD attack so I have no sympathy for an over-stressed sys admin or security consultant being defined as a PTSD case.  Stress?  Mega-stress?  Fine, been there, done that.  But to use this argument for cyber sec is just wrong and does ill to those of us who have been through a living hell and survived. 

BTW - many of my response posts relate to disaster recovery and business continuity scenarios which do not exist whenever a ransomware attack happens.  I am strong on this subject precisely because of September 11.

Update - I realize that this note seems really mean and nasty to the article which does have good points all over - I am just strong on this subject for obvious reasons so take my commentary with a big grain of salt and a shot of Dewars.  Thanks


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