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WannaCry Remains No. 1 Ransomware Weapon
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REISEN1955
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REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
8/27/2019 | 2:30:45 PM
The most effective defense?
An educated user pool to start with with basic rules of email iusage.  Secondly a verified, vetted and tested  backup and restoration plan --- make sure it works.  Third are active patching and firewall monitoring.  All fall under the care of the internal IT staff and if they do not do these chores ..... well, Welcome to Hell.  
Kelly Jackson Higgins
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Kelly Jackson Higgins,
User Rank: Strategist
8/27/2019 | 2:33:48 PM
Re: The most effective defense?
All good points. But when their apps or processes still rely on antiquated OSes like Win7 and updating disrupts the biz, then some orgs just ride it out with security tools to catch these threats, etc.
REISEN1955
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REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
8/27/2019 | 2:54:38 PM
Re: The most effective defense?
True and the OS update issue is the responsibility of the IT staff and team to make clear and evident - THAT is their job and all too often, well, disrupting the business is just TOO HARD.  Like that patch that brought down Equifax.  Right?   I work with a CSirt team using great tools and while every firm and small business may not have access, it still has to be tackled as best allowed.  But keeping old W7 systems running now is asking for trouble.  As it was with XP ( of which alot of that is still out there on legacy boxes).  The IT staff has a daunting job sometimes but it is THEIR JOB and if they do not like it, there are always trade school courses on welding. 

Disclaimer: I am something of an expert on disaster recovery techniques when 18 years ago I had to walk down out of my office building in lower Manhattan and shortly later the data center on the 103rd floor of the south tower followed me down.  I am a survivor of that day from Aon, on the 101st floor, S-tower, of the World Trade Center.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
8/29/2019 | 1:38:56 PM
Re: The most effective defense?
"True and the OS update issue is the responsibility of the IT staff and team to make clear and eviden"

It would be responsible in operational aspect of it but overall business is responsible of the security of the business

 

Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
8/29/2019 | 1:40:59 PM
Re: The most effective defense?
"But keeping old W7 systems running now is asking for trouble.  As it was with XP ( of which alot of that is still out there on legacy boxes)."

Agree. If there is a newer version of an operating system, there is no real reason using older version.

 

Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
8/29/2019 | 1:43:00 PM
Re: The most effective defense?
"The IT staff has a daunting job sometimes but it is THEIR JOB and if they do not like it, there are always trade school courses on welding."

This is really a good point it is good amount of effort needed to keep systems up-to-date

 

AndrewfOP
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AndrewfOP,
User Rank: Moderator
8/28/2019 | 9:20:57 AM
Re: The most effective defense?
"All good points. But when their apps or processes still rely on antiquated OSes like Win7 and updating disrupts the biz, then some orgs just ride it out with security tools to catch these threats, etc."

While I sympathize with the familiarities of existing business tools on machines with old Window systems and the disruptions caused on replacing them, it's still no excuse not to plan for the future with new tools fitting business needs that would be compatible with the latest OS. Especially now that Microsoft seems to be getting out of making-new-Windows-to-make-money business, future disruptions to business should be minimal and all the more reason to get new tools with security features built in.

 
tdsan
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tdsan,
User Rank: Ninja
8/28/2019 | 6:48:52 PM
Re: The most effective defense?
Andrew, I must agree with you, there is no excuse.

Companies are still holding on to Windows 7 (wow), this is what it means to be loyal to a fault or not have the personnel on staff to make this migration happen (holding on to the very end).

After January 14, 2020, Microsoft will no longer provide security updates or support for PCs running Windows 7

I do think there are solutions to this problem, roll-out VDI solution and deploy desktops in a virtual session, this can be easily done without breaking the bank. VMware HorizonView or Citrix XenDesktop/XenApp work, if they want to go to the cloud, use WorkSpaces, there are a number of things they could have done.

At the end of the day, it is time to move off this platform, this says a lot about companies not taking into consideration the time and planning stages they could have planned to create a seamless migration process. When companies are hacked, the business owners, executive staff members should be removed from their position because they did not follow best practices and follow due-diligence.

Windows 7 End of Life

T
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
8/29/2019 | 1:31:39 PM
Re: The most effective defense?
"Companies are still holding on to Windows 7"

Yes I'm working with a few other companies where they are still using Windows 7. It is running but will not be secure anymore. 

 

Dr.T
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50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
8/29/2019 | 1:33:06 PM
Re: The most effective defense?
"When companies are hacked, the business owners, executive staff members should be removed from their position because they did not follow best practices and follow due-diligence."

I would say there should be some responsibilities, not everybody is directly involved into this type of activities such as upgrading Win 7.

 

Dr.T
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50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
8/29/2019 | 1:34:19 PM
Re: The most effective defense?
"VMware HorizonView or Citrix XenDesktop/XenApp work, if they want to go to the cloud, use WorkSpaces"

I agree, that is true but they are very expensive at the same time.

 

Dr.T
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50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
8/29/2019 | 1:36:10 PM
Re: The most effective defense?
"it's still no excuse not to plan for the future with new tools fitting business needs that would be compatible with the latest OS"

I would agree with this, there shouldn't be so much effort anyway as long as you standardized your upgrade process.

 

Dr.T
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50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
8/29/2019 | 1:37:19 PM
Re: The most effective defense?
"future disruptions to business should be minimal and all the more reason to get new tools with security features built in."

Agree with this, if there's an outage business will lose more time and money.

 

Dr.T
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50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
8/29/2019 | 1:44:17 PM
Re: The most effective defense?
"An educated user pool to start with with basic rules of email iusage. "

I think you made a very good point, it starts with the users.

 

Dr.T
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50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
8/29/2019 | 1:29:02 PM
WannaCry

The main lesson is to keep the systems up to date, obvisuly. 

 

sudeshkumar
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50%
sudeshkumar,
User Rank: Apprentice
9/2/2019 | 7:22:05 AM
Re: WannaCry
I heard of this virus. few months ago it was one of the most famous virus. 


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