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US Mayors Commit to Just Saying No to Ransomware
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REISEN1955
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REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
7/17/2019 | 8:59:40 AM
Re: Correct response
Let us see if these same people commit to hiring QUALIFIED IT PROFESSIONALS and maintain a tested disaster recovery and backup plan??   Betcha a bunch won't do that and claim cost as an issue.
tdsan
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tdsan,
User Rank: Ninja
7/17/2019 | 7:58:25 AM
Re: Correct response

I agree, but the problem with Georgia or Florida agencies (government) is they did not have the resources in place to address the problem (ransom payments 10K, 600K and 450K). It would have taken them months to recover (time-sensitive, case and healthcare situations). In the instance of one agency, they spent 1.2 million to recover, put in mitigating procedures but the ransom was only 50K (they lost in countless areas; did they really address the problem?).


 

In certain instances, you have to weigh the cost, there was an instance where the captors provided a way to recover part of their data (proof). So it is hard to determine if they are telling the truth or not, in this instance, they obtained proof. But in the case of the FBI (https://www.fbi.gov/investigate/cyber), they say not to pay them but when the mayor or governor is asking for pertinent court or hospital information that could affect the lives of others, I don't think it is so cut and dry, you have to weigh your options (in this case the Mayor stood by his beliefs).

RyanSepe
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50%
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
7/16/2019 | 2:20:20 PM
Correct response
This is always the correct response. You operate under two assumptions if you don't. You expect your non-ethical attackers to act ethically and return your data after payment. Secondly, that they won't try to sell that data even after its provided to you. They could also maintain their foothold and just compromise your data all over again. Rinse and repeat. Always smartest to cut your losses and look to mitigate their present entry and proactively ensure that you do not end up in this situation again.


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