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New Exploit for Microsoft Excel Power Query
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tdsan
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tdsan,
User Rank: Ninja
6/30/2019 | 2:57:58 PM
Re: More often then not
Yep, there is actually an aspect of Linux that a number of professionals don't use, it is called SeLinux Policies. This works very well from the filesystem, bin files, and application exploitation.

This something the IT Security consultant should be aware and knowledgeable as well - https://web.mit.edu/rhel-doc/5/RHEL-5-manual/Deployment_Guide-en-US/rhlcommon-chapter-0001.html
Quote - The SELinux policy defines various rules which determine how each domain may access each type. Only what is specifically allowed by the rules is permitted. By default, every operation is denied and audited, meaning it is logged in the $AUDIT_LOG file. In Red Hat Enterprise Linux, this is set to /var/log/messages. The policy is compiled into binary format for loading into the kernel security server, and each time the security server makes a decision, it is cached in the AVC to optimize performance.

Auditing at the filesystem, file execution and kernel layer. In addition, if a file entered into the filesystem, this would be identified and not allowed to process because it is not part of the SeLinux profile.

Todd
RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
6/30/2019 | 7:58:34 AM
Re: More often then not
Yes definitely get the point and concur 100%. Thanks for the inclusion of Linux based variants. It adds the juxtaposing perspective to this situation.
tdsan
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tdsan,
User Rank: Ninja
6/28/2019 | 9:23:29 PM
Re: More often then not

More often then not, I notice that organizations are wrapped up in patching for vulnerabilities but not so adamant about system hardening. Items relating to locking down applications through GPO. This would definitely fall under that category.

Excellent, I agree with you from this point. I do think this is good from a Windows standpoint (GPOs are the way to go along with implementing SIEM, NGFW (Next Generation Firewalls, Micro-Segmentation):
  • Sample code written using PowerShell/Json to address some of the security issues associated with Windows (this is an example that can be pushed out to machines as well, GPOs are more efficient, this will help with one offs)
    Write-Host " "
    Write-Host "LSA Registry Entries"
    Write-Host "--------------------"
    Write-Host " "
    
    $lsa = '{"registry":[
        {"Entry":"auditbaseobjects", "Value":"1", "Type":"Dword"},
        {"Entry":"auditbasedirectories", "Value":"1", "Type":"Dword"},
        {"Entry":"LmCompatibilityLevel", "Value":"4", "Type":"Dword"},
        {"Entry":"restrictanonymous", "Value":"1", "Type":"Dword"},
        {"Entry":"restrictanonymoussam", "Value":"1", "Type":"Dword"},
        {"Entry":"LimitBlankPasswordUse", "Value":"1", "Type":"Dword"},
        {"Entry":"SecureBoot", "Value":"1", "Type":"Dword"}
    ]}'
    
    $path = "HKLM:\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Lsa"
    $regobj = ConvertFrom-Json -InputObject $lsa
    $regobjects = $regobj.registry
    
    foreach ( $i in $regobjects ) {
        $val = Get-ItemPropertyValue -Path $path -Name $i.Entry -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue
        if ( (Test-Path $path) -and ($i.Value -eq $val ) ) {
            Write-Host $i.Entry "registry value - ok"
        } else {
            #New-Item -path $path -Name $i.Entry -Value $i.Value -Type Dword
            $chg = Set-ItemProperty -Path $path -Name $i.Entry -Value $i.Value -Type $i.Type -Force
            $names = Get-ItemPropertyValue -Path $path -Name $i.Entry
            Write-Host $i.Entry "modified registry entry: " $names
        }
    }

 

Linux security concepts to address some of the IT security issues (these are just examples but it is good to know)
  • Libre Office needs to be reviewed to see if the same vulnerabilities exist (when editing an excel spreadsheet)
  • Remove unused accounts (Windows & Linux)
  • Configure SELinux policies to check filesystem and executables (binaries)
  • Configure iptables and chains, ufw helps with this process
  • Encrypt /home/* folders and other necessary files
  • Enable IPv6 to be the primary protocol used over the Internet (IPSec VPN AES256)
  • Use logwatch to view the logs on the system and send notifications daily or weekly
  • Email - use pgp as part of the email security solution - https://bit.ly/2LoOxta
  • Create PEM keys to allow for secured access to ssh with authorized _keys file
  • Reduce the number of running applications, uninstall unnecessary applications
  • Create a gold-standard of the OS where Puppet/Chef/Satellite Server can help with the updates
  • Configure crontab to schedule updates to the system
  • Implement NMS & Security system to monitor the internal workings and log files
  • Install chkrootkit & rkhunter trojan tools
  • Ensure continuous monitoring tools are running to address any cyber-shortcomings
  • Enable SIEM, ML, AV, and training to thwart potential threats or vulnerabilities

There are other steps that I have left out but this was off the top of my head.

I think you get the point.

Todd
RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
6/28/2019 | 9:44:17 AM
More often then not
More often then not, I notice that organizations are wrapped up in patching for vulnerabilities but not so adamant about system hardening. Items relating to locking down applications through GPO. This would definitely fall under that category.


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