Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Comments
Predicting Vulnerability Weaponization
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
tdsan
tdsan,
User Rank: Ninja
6/29/2019 | 3:22:22 PM
Logical review of the analytics process
With a data set established, we need analytical models to gain predictive insights. By looking at historical weaponization trends, we can train algorithms to look across diverse types of data and identify the combination of traits that best predicts which vulnerabilities will be weaponized by attackers in the wild. Just as importantly, this approach can predict the speed at which a given vulnerability is likely to be weaponized.
  •  Traits and vulnerabilities - Couldn't we start with the threats that actually succeeded. Then take that information and categorize it using the risk score from CVE or others. take that information and create a relationship database (i.e SharedDB or No-SQL columnar DB) where big data comes into play to establish or identify those relationships, this will help the end-user determine the number of similarities between the variants or possible vulnerabilities that exist
  • Locations - identify where the code is coming from by associating the geographic regions, with the code, actors and success levels, this allows for those models (again Big Data) to start narrowing down the attacks to specific regions based on the type of attack, its function, success rate and locale (determine the type of attack and method of attack based on their success rate and design).
  • Finally, use ML to look at the attack vectors from a historical standpoint, the results from BigData can now inject its findings into the ML DB and from those relationshps, we can determine based on risk score if something else will occur as part of the variants evolution (most systems build on itself).

ML Concepts

 

Big Data
alpana.b
alpana.b,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/20/2019 | 6:42:52 AM
Automated Testing
Can there be a solution as Automated Testing? Or a testing that can run 24/7  and immediately identify existing or newly created vulnerabilities? At least for DDoS testing, I know there is such product available - this product doesn't need any maintenance window, for enterprises its a business as usual and testing report is handed over to security team to tackle issues with vendor. https://mazebolt.com/ddos-radar 

Do you see any such product for other security areas which can emerge as new technology?
dmddd
dmddd,
User Rank: Apprentice
6/13/2019 | 11:32:09 PM
Reference
Death Srinivas, Thanks for the interesting article. Would you mind sharing the reference of the underlying research paper? Best regards, David


Edge-DRsplash-10-edge-articles
I Smell a RAT! New Cybersecurity Threats for the Crypto Industry
David Trepp, Partner, IT Assurance with accounting and advisory firm BPM LLP,  7/9/2021
News
Attacks on Kaseya Servers Led to Ransomware in Less Than 2 Hours
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  7/7/2021
Commentary
It's in the Game (but It Shouldn't Be)
Tal Memran, Cybersecurity Expert, CYE,  7/9/2021
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
Black Hat USA 2022 Attendee Report
Black Hat attendees are not sleeping well. Between concerns about attacks against cloud services, ransomware, and the growing risks to the global supply chain, these security pros have a lot to be worried about. Read our 2022 report to hear what they're concerned about now.
Flash Poll
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2021-42750
PUBLISHED: 2022-08-12
A cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability in Rule Engine in ThingsBoard 3.3.1 allows remote attackers (with administrative access) to inject arbitrary JavaScript within the title of a rule node.
CVE-2021-42751
PUBLISHED: 2022-08-12
A cross-site scripting (XSS) vulnerability in Rule Engine in ThingsBoard 3.3.1 allows remote attackers (with administrative access) to inject arbitrary JavaScript within the description of a rule node.
CVE-2022-35585
PUBLISHED: 2022-08-12
A stored cross-site scripting (XSS) issue in the ForkCMS version 5.9.3 allows remote attackers to inject JavaScript via the "start_date" Parameter
CVE-2022-35587
PUBLISHED: 2022-08-12
A cross-site scripting (XSS) issue in the Fork version 5.9.3 allows remote attackers to inject JavaScript via the "publish_on_date" Parameter
CVE-2022-35589
PUBLISHED: 2022-08-12
A cross-site scripting (XSS) issue in the Fork version 5.9.3 allows remote attackers to inject JavaScript via the "publish_on_time" Parameter.