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FBI Warns of Dangers in 'Safe' Websites
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timcallan
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timcallan,
User Rank: Author
10/23/2019 | 12:18:40 PM
Authentic company information is available
It's important to understand that not all site certificates (known as TLS or SSL certificates) are the same.  The ciminals almost exclusively use "domain validated" certificates, which contain no authenticated information about the identiy of the site.  However, sites have the opportunity to use a different type of certificate called Extended Validation, or EV.

All EV certificates include the authenticated identity information of the company operating the site.  This authentication follows codified methodology that has proven effective in more then ten years of widespread global use.  Browsers have the opportunity to dispay this information so that a user can distinguish between a real site and a crafty criminal fake.

Unfortunately, popular browsers Chrome and Firefox have chosen not to display this information. The good news for users is that they have alternatives that do.  Browsers like Safari and Edge change their interface to indicate that EV authenticated information is available and allow users to view it.
REISEN1955
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50%
REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
6/11/2019 | 1:54:54 PM
A good policy
This works: If you don't need it, don't read it, delete it.  Simple and easy to remember


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