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Satan Ransomware Adds More Evil Tricks
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RetiredUser
RetiredUser,
User Rank: Ninja
5/22/2019 | 2:38:42 AM
Hail Satan! (or DBGer?)
In 2018 some started calling Satan "DBGer", and we learned it was using EternalBlue and Mimikatz to propogate to machines on the same network; exploiting Remote Code Execution (RCE) vulnerabilities, using network credentials acquired by Mimikatz. It had newly incorporated a version of the EternalBlue SMB exploit, which WannaCry, NotPetya and UIWIX also used.  It was being called DBGer because after the satan.exe dropped into the infected computer, started the encryption process on the disk, and completed the encryption process, it renamed the encrypted files with a new extension ".dbger" - I bring this up only because in the latest Satan news, I don't see this variant mentioned "top-level" - you're lucky to find it at the first three levels of reporting.  It's surely out there still and that detail is one that could help the casual observer with less experience spot details in their server filesystem that could flag a potential intrusion.


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