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How the Skills Gap Strains and Constrains Security Pros
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bwilkes8@gmail.com
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5/10/2019 | 1:52:23 PM
How the Skills Gap Strains and Constrains Security Pros
Kelly great article.  Is it possible the industry professionals are creating or perpetuating the problem?  I learned from a senior military NCO many years ago, "You're expendable!"  For these professionals to make the statement "they don't have time", sets themselves and the company they work for up for failure, disaster, breaches, you pick.  I took from your article that this is a mentality of the sky is falling in the security realm.  May I ask, how many of these companies are helping themselves and their security team by creating or are actively engaged in finding a solution outside of the traditional ways? This is a self-inflicted wound as we'd say in the military.  It could have been avoided, most importantly it can be corrected.  This situation is a SNAFU and not a FUBAR.

Kelly, if such a high percentage believe the Opposing Force has the edge, a repeatable solution has to be implemented to stave them off.  Are these professionals in your article advocating change within their company or are they simply just dealing with it?

Of the 65% impeded by their jobs, what percentage have onboarded a junior security member?  How many are willing to take on a junior member to mentor?  Is it more productive to be tired and burned out as security professional or to be focused?  How many have made an investment to aid in growth?  I've read many articles similar to yours stating the same thing, but I've only read one this year where the writer proposed a solution.  Here's my two cents.

Investing is done with a goal of receiving "something" in the near or distance future.  Investing is intentional and planned.  Investing is purposeful, planned and should be well executed.  How many of the professionals surveyed are investing in an aspiring or junior security professional?  "Nothing from nothing leaves nothing", no investing in the future means no return, therefore, no gain or in this case no progress in finding a solution to the frustration and burnout these professionals are experiencing.

As as an SME in my fields, in the military, I learned when and what to delegate.  Without delegation being overworked, stressed and substandard performance are guaranteed.  Delegation is not dumping your undesired tasks onto some else's plate, it's giving another individual the opportunity to learn, with oversight.  Yes, you have will spend time training that individual and in the beginning your workload is increased, but in the end a professional is created and a more manageable workload surfaces.  Oversimplified?  Yes, it is, but it's a recipe for a beginning.

I was trained to find solutions to problems and that failure was not an option.  This crisis in the making is manageable.  Just my two cents.


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