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Security Doesn't Trust IT and IT Doesn't Trust Security
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BradleyRoss
BradleyRoss,
User Rank: Moderator
5/9/2019 | 5:17:45 PM
Not trusting
The meetings I attended involved ten or twelve people with every person saying that they were in charge.  The next statement was usually that whatever went wrong, it was somebody else's fault.

In several cases, Security set requirements that were expensive and useless, but then said that it was up to IT to find the funding for the changes.  If Security wants to set policy, it has to do a number of things

Set clear policies and enforce them on everybody, including the C-Suite and themselves

If Security wants to set policies, it has to justify the required expenditure and be honest about the expenditures.  If they can't justify the expenses to the top executives, how is IT going to do it.  If Security has to make themselves unpopular, that is their job.

Be willing to justify their requirements, listen to the users, and be willing to admit when they are wrong.

Recognize that there are many people in IT who actually are far more knowledgable about computer security than they are.  I shouldn't have to explain customer requirements on security to the security staff.  I had a person in Security who told me that he didn't understand a government document.  I went through it, and found a list of referenced documents in the first few pages that contained glossaries and background information.  His response was that nobody had told him to read the other document which contained background material and a glossary.  I repeated that the preface stated that you had to go by the other document.  He said that he didn't care what the preface said, he was only told to follow the rest of the document.

Don't tell people that they are just too stupid to understand how brilliant they are.  I've actually encountered that.

When you receive a letter from the customer stating that you used to have the best and the brightest, but they were replaced by people who were far less competent than those that they replaced but believed themselves to be far more competent, don't state that you don't understand what they are trying to say.

If you really want to impress people, make sure that you specify the character encoding on your web pages.  The little black diamonds with question marks inside don't help your credibility.  If you don't specify it, your browser will probably use either UTF-8 or ISO-8850-1 according to how the browser is set up, but that won't necessarily match what was used in the page.  If you don't know what I'm talking about,don't pass yourself off as a computer expert.

Finally, you have to realize that people who worry about losing control never had it in the first place and never will.
BradleyRoss
BradleyRoss,
User Rank: Moderator
5/9/2019 | 5:17:44 PM
Not trusting
The meetings I attended involved ten or twelve people with every person saying that they were in charge.  The next statement was usually that whatever went wrong, it was somebody else's fault.

In several cases, Security set requirements that were expensive and useless, but then said that it was up to IT to find the funding for the changes.  If Security wants to set policy, it has to do a number of things

Set clear policies and enforce them on everybody, including the C-Suite and themselves

If Security wants to set policies, it has to justify the required expenditure and be honest about the expenditures.  If they can't justify the expenses to the top executives, how is IT going to do it.  If Security has to make themselves unpopular, that is their job.

Be willing to justify their requirements, listen to the users, and be willing to admit when they are wrong.

Recognize that there are many people in IT who actually are far more knowledgable about computer security than they are.  I shouldn't have to explain customer requirements on security to the security staff.  I had a person in Security who told me that he didn't understand a government document.  I went through it, and found a list of referenced documents in the first few pages that contained glossaries and background information.  His response was that nobody had told him to read the other document which contained background material and a glossary.  I repeated that the preface stated that you had to go by the other document.  He said that he didn't care what the preface said, he was only told to follow the rest of the document.


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