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Security Analysts Are Only Human
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barefoot_marine
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barefoot_marine,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/21/2019 | 1:22:07 PM
Automation is KEY
Definitely agree. Implementing solutions that replace Tier 1 assets is critical to effective security growth of an organization. Tier 1 analysts have the highest turnover and burnout rates. We ask them to help secure our infrastructure, but in reality, all they become are button monkeys, clicking yes/no. Barely able to keep up with that, let alone do research to validate the escalation. 

A SOC, coupled with the right internal and external intelligence, plus orchestration can effectively automate Tier 1, finally allowing jr SOC analysts a place to grow into more meaningful workflows.
RyanSepe
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RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
2/22/2019 | 3:45:00 PM
Minimizing Mistakes by Maximizing Actionable Intelligence
As the title denotes, Security Analysts are only human. A human element will always be needed to one degree or another but they are prone to error. For this reason, Security Professionals need to look towards maximizing automatic logic. As stated, receiving 10K alerts per day would be an impossible task to review without automated logic built into the coding of your SOC. We've made great progress but if we can continue to push the limits of our efficiency we can continue to diminish the degree of error that is inherent to our being.
MariaColeman
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50%
MariaColeman,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/25/2019 | 5:21:53 AM
Re: Automation is KEY
Very correctly and logically said.
Dr.T
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50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
2/25/2019 | 11:14:38 AM
Automation
Viewing alerts is unsustainable in its current form. The role needs to transition to a fully automated process I think this is the important step in security analysist workflow, they can not possible to go over all those false positives.
Dr.T
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50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
2/25/2019 | 11:17:49 AM
Re: Automation is KEY
Tier 1 analysts have the highest turnover and burnout rates. That makes sense. It is a tiring workflow, trying to catch one thing in a mass is frustrating too.
Dr.T
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50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
2/25/2019 | 11:19:00 AM
Re: Automation is KEY
A SOC, coupled with the right internal and external intelligence, plus orchestration can effectively automate Tier 1 Agree. They can also use AI offload some initial workload.
Dr.T
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50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
2/25/2019 | 11:20:09 AM
Re: Minimizing Mistakes by Maximizing Actionable Intelligence
A human element will always be needed to one degree or another but they are prone to error. Agree. As being the weakest link in overall security, we are vulnerable too.
Dr.T
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50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
2/25/2019 | 11:22:43 AM
Re: Minimizing Mistakes by Maximizing Actionable Intelligence
As stated, receiving 10K alerts per day would be an impossible task to review without automated logic built into the coding of your SOC I agree. Also stated most are false possitive. One option could be generating those alerts in more intelligent ways.
Joe Stanganelli
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50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
2/25/2019 | 8:01:44 PM
Automate the fatigue?
Indeed, I've recently interviewed consultants on this very topic who are espousing the same message -- and pundits in the press and thought leadership are also calling for AI/ML/automation solutions in place of humans for handling the day-to-day. The machines don't get fatigued at the same rate as the humans do.
Joe Stanganelli
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50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
2/25/2019 | 8:05:12 PM
Re: Automation is KEY
@Dr.T: Moreover, sometimes these analysts will see malicious traffic and give a heads up to an affected organization -- who, sometimes, will expressly tell the tier-1 to not call them again (because they'd rather not know, because of the compliance triggers).

Perverse, but it happens.
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