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Nest Hack Leaves Homeowner Sleepless in Chicago
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WarnR
50%
50%
WarnR,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/5/2019 | 10:07:15 AM
Troubling Comments
Tho I agree the home owner should and does bare some reasonability on this issue, I do find the comments troubling. Customers, like any user in a company, relies on the Computer & Security experts to guide them. If a user in a company is not trained about not sharing passwords, or leaving a computer unlocked due to no training, is it the user's fault or the Training team for not having the mandatory training?

A few questions come to my mind reading this - was the home owner informed that they information had become compromised? That they needed to change their passwords? Is there updated announcements regarding training of new features? Do users understand or even know that systems are not 100% secure no matter what?

The comments I had read have a touch of arrogance. Being in the computer and security field we understand these things. Not all users do. If you go to a Doc for a health issue, should the doc talk down to you or make comments about how you should have known something?  
blodgettcalvin
50%
50%
blodgettcalvin,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/4/2019 | 11:24:26 AM
Not secure
This situation once again shows that modern technologies, such as the Internet of Things, do not fully provide people with complete safety
mattsweet
50%
50%
mattsweet,
User Rank: Strategist
2/4/2019 | 10:39:31 AM
Subject needs to be changed
This was not a hack of Nest. This was typical enduser behavior. Google should have stated while they sympathize with the user, the user needs to be better educated to the harsh reality IoT can be and how to be responsible.

I do feel for the homeowners, though. I would be freaked out myself.
RyanSepe
0%
100%
RyanSepe,
User Rank: Ninja
2/4/2019 | 9:16:12 AM
Re: Very misleading title
I concur with @hhendrickson274 assessment. The fault lies with the user. I also find it interesting that even though Google did nothing wrong, they had to take the PC route with that statement. It baffles me that even in a scenario like this, a titan like Google needs to release a statement such as to try to save face from the court of public opinion. 
ameerz
50%
50%
ameerz,
User Rank: Apprentice
2/4/2019 | 7:07:19 AM
Re: Very misleading title
is this just a fad article??

what supporting views r shared??
hhendrickson274
100%
0%
hhendrickson274,
User Rank: Strategist
2/3/2019 | 4:08:02 PM
Very misleading title
This was not a hack of Nest at all. This was user stupidity by refusing passwords across sites/services. I especially like how the user feels it is Googles fault and they should get their money back. Please change the title, unless you meant it to be click-bait. What happened is a very real consequence of users not taking their part in information security seriously, but it was not a hack based on the limited information presented in the article. This sort of sensationalism doesnt serve to improve the state of affairs, it just perpetuates FUD.


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