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How the US Chooses Which Zero-Day Vulnerabilities to Stockpile
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MelBrandle
MelBrandle,
User Rank: Moderator
1/26/2019 | 2:33:26 AM
Selective disclosure
What I reckon is happening is that the government is keeping all these secrets in storage for fear that if the data got out, that the hackers would be able to replicate what's been going on. They would have to be very careful what  information to release if they're going to disclose any of it at all!
michaelmaloney
michaelmaloney,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/25/2019 | 2:27:16 AM
Staying neutral is best
I guess the I belong in the third group as well because every scenario would often come with its own pros and cons. It is not entirely up to us alone to weigh in on whether or not the vulnerabilities should indeed be kept in a secret storage or be let out in the open. Instead, we need to analyze on the given situation at that exact moment in time to see which solution suits best.
ConwayK9781
ConwayK9781,
User Rank: Strategist
1/17/2019 | 9:19:02 AM
Huh...
> "And then there's a third group, to which I belong. This crowd understands both the benefits and consequences that can occur when governments find and conceal vulnerabilities."
> implies only third group understand both
> proceeds to show that the third group clearly doesn't, as they support a government weaponizing zero-days at the expense of the citizens for its own personal gain




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