Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Comments
2018: The Year Machine Intelligence Arrived in Cybersecurity
Threaded  |  Newest First  |  Oldest First
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/27/2018 | 11:39:43 AM
Speed
What machine learning has really given us is the ability to predict patterns before they actually happen I think this is the important aspect of AI in cyber security, the speed.
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/27/2018 | 11:41:31 AM
Probabilistic
"The best use of AI is to give security admins the ability to deconflict tasks to know which, out of scores of possibilities, are critical and will have the greatest impact," This makes sense. AI is probabilistic, not deterministic. So someone should intervene at one point.
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
12/31/2018 | 10:42:13 PM
Re: Probabilistic
> AI is probabilistic, not deterministic.

Is it, though? I mean, sure, modern ML programming relies on PPLs, but we have not reached true/generalized AI yet. Perhaps AI models will evolve such that some are more deterministic in nature.

Or maybe I'm overthinking this.
Curt Franklin
50%
50%
Curt Franklin,
User Rank: Author
1/2/2019 | 10:54:52 AM
Re: Probabilistic
Joe, my understanding is that AI can be deterministic, but it's capable of being deterministic in ways that the developer didn't anticipate. Where machine learning is great at reaching rapid conclusions within a known population of answers, AI should be capable of "thinking outside the box" and finding correlations (and therefore, conclusions) that are outside any previously anticipate answers.

That's a much tougher thing to develop, and why most of the AI researchers I've talked to say that what we're seeing in security (and most of commercia computing) today is correctly classified as ML rather than AI.
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
1/8/2019 | 7:01:24 PM
Re: Probabilistic
@Curt: Yep. When you press even the most gung-ho "We offer AI!" marketers, they will admit that, no, they really don't -- at least, not generalized AI (a.k.a. "true AI", as we tend to think of it).

Unrelatedly, I really dig the drawn portrait that is your avatar. Florida artist?
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/27/2018 | 11:43:04 AM
False positives
Microsoft sees 6.5 trillion security signals a day. AI helps rationalize them down to a quantity that humans can deal with Yes. This helps us avoiding false positives.
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
12/31/2018 | 10:44:24 PM
Re: False positives
@Dr. T: In security studies, security-alert fatigue is routinely identified as the top or near-top obstacle facing security teams.

AI/ML can help, but you can also accomplish a lot by trying some lower-tech techniques (like banning all non-whitelisted bots, for instance).
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/27/2018 | 11:44:55 AM
Big data
Machines are really good at looking at vast amounts of data and making sense of it all in a statistical way, and humans are not That makes sense. Humans are not equipped for big data, we need AI help to deal with it.
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
12/31/2018 | 10:39:05 PM
Re: Big data
@Dr. T: That's the very definition of big data: data collections that are so big that humans unaided by tech automation cannot possibly contend with them.

The real question, however, is to what extent actual ML and AI are necessary for this. Terrific analytics advances have been made -- but hurdles are still left to be overcome.
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/27/2018 | 11:47:16 AM
Humans and AI
we're a long away from totally automating out the need for some type of security professional that occasionally has to make a decision." I would agree. Currently decision of action would still require humans in most scenarios.


7 Tips for Infosec Pros Considering A Lateral Career Move
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  1/21/2020
For Mismanaged SOCs, The Price Is Not Right
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  1/22/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
IT 2020: A Look Ahead
Are you ready for the critical changes that will occur in 2020? We've compiled editor insights from the best of our network (Dark Reading, Data Center Knowledge, InformationWeek, ITPro Today and Network Computing) to deliver to you a look at the trends, technologies, and threats that are emerging in the coming year. Download it today!
Flash Poll
How Enterprises are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
How Enterprises are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
Organizations have invested in a sweeping array of security technologies to address challenges associated with the growing number of cybersecurity attacks. However, the complexity involved in managing these technologies is emerging as a major problem. Read this report to find out what your peers biggest security challenges are and the technologies they are using to address them.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2015-3154
PUBLISHED: 2020-01-27
CRLF injection vulnerability in Zend\Mail (Zend_Mail) in Zend Framework before 1.12.12, 2.x before 2.3.8, and 2.4.x before 2.4.1 allows remote attackers to inject arbitrary HTTP headers and conduct HTTP response splitting attacks via CRLF sequences in the header of an email.
CVE-2019-17190
PUBLISHED: 2020-01-27
A Local Privilege Escalation issue was discovered in Avast Secure Browser 76.0.1659.101. The vulnerability is due to an insecure ACL set by the AvastBrowserUpdate.exe (which is running as NT AUTHORITY\SYSTEM) when AvastSecureBrowser.exe checks for new updates. When the update check is triggered, the...
CVE-2014-8161
PUBLISHED: 2020-01-27
PostgreSQL before 9.0.19, 9.1.x before 9.1.15, 9.2.x before 9.2.10, 9.3.x before 9.3.6, and 9.4.x before 9.4.1 allows remote authenticated users to obtain sensitive column values by triggering constraint violation and then reading the error message.
CVE-2014-9481
PUBLISHED: 2020-01-27
The Scribunto extension for MediaWiki allows remote attackers to obtain the rollback token and possibly other sensitive information via a crafted module, related to unstripping special page HTML.
CVE-2015-0241
PUBLISHED: 2020-01-27
The to_char function in PostgreSQL before 9.0.19, 9.1.x before 9.1.15, 9.2.x before 9.2.10, 9.3.x before 9.3.6, and 9.4.x before 9.4.1 allows remote authenticated users to cause a denial of service (crash) or possibly execute arbitrary code via a (1) large number of digits when processing a numeric ...