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3 Reasons to Train Security Pros to Code
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Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
12/31/2018 | 10:53:10 PM
Re: Coders?
@Dr. T: Sure. The more you know, the more flexibly and powerfully you are able to innovate a solution. This is true of pretty much everything.

I recently read a story of an ad man who was able to come up with effective copy for a watch by understanding the process of the development of the watch technology. The same applies to security -- particularly because so much of blue-team work relies on anticipating red-team actions and innovations that may seem non-intuitive.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
12/31/2018 | 10:49:34 PM
"Code shaming"
I saw a reference to this debate recently on Twitter. One security pundit was commenting that we shouldn't "code-shame" security people for not knowing to code because of the shortage of talent and to encourage their contributions. Perhaps a fair point to some extent, but for crying out loud, we are talking about some fairly critical skills here. Can you be an effective and high-quality security professional without knowing to code? Sure, probably. Can you be even BETTER at your job by knowing how to code? Almost certainly. (Plus, you'll be able to communicate better with the devs, who typically don't give a crap what the security people think or have to say.)
t6c4u2c
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t6c4u2c,
User Rank: Apprentice
12/28/2018 | 10:26:29 AM
Basics of coding.
Any particular language that'd be useful for SecOps to learn/understand?  Python, Javascript or others perhaps?  
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/27/2018 | 9:20:58 AM
Automation
In addition to helping security people build their own automation, the coding skills also allowed the team to start building out security policy as code. Yes. Automation will help and when aligned with the security policies then we have an effective countermeasure.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/27/2018 | 9:18:51 AM
Scripting
in one case an experienced network security pro took what they learned and built out a firewall automation API for the firm. Yes. Knowledge of scripting will help security personnels to find creative solution and automation. AI is another aspect of it.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/27/2018 | 9:16:50 AM
Coders?
"I would say in the end we didn't get a whole bunch of new coders, but what we did was we changed people's thinking." I would not think we expect security guys become coders, however this would help to understand and find out creative solutions.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/27/2018 | 9:14:49 AM
DevSecOps
Part of the DevSecOps ethos is getting out of that finger-pointing, tribal mentality and instead coming together as a cohesive team no matter the role whether developer, operations staff, QA, or security. This is important for an organization to be successful in their security program. Working together.
Dr.T
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Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/27/2018 | 9:13:16 AM
Coding to CICO
I always thought CICOs know how to code at least they know how to script, if not I am not sours how they can manage their role.


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