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NASA Investigating Breach That Exposed PII on Employees, Ex-Workers
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NathanDavidson
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NathanDavidson,
User Rank: Moderator
1/8/2019 | 4:15:44 AM
Background checks
It is scary to know that data breaches within even the most successful organisations have become ever so common within the recent past. In majority of such cases, an internal breach is to be blamed which simply means that the organisation had committed a mistake during their recruitment drive. Every single employee ought to be sucritinized in terms of their background checks just to see if there's any potential amongst any of the workers to commit crimes like data breaches.
CameronRobertson
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50%
CameronRobertson,
User Rank: Moderator
1/3/2019 | 6:33:59 AM
would think that personnel working
You would think that personnel working in a facility with that kind of security especially with the amount of sensitive information going around that place, would know better about how to protect themselves from being the target of attack when it comes to external forces trying to attack the facility for the data in storage... Seems like they still have a lot to learn...
Dr.T
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50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/26/2018 | 12:55:31 PM
Re: inb4
cybersecurity isn't rocket science" joke Agree. Hart to argue with it.
Dr.T
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50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/26/2018 | 12:54:06 PM
Re: Reasons why these things continue to happen at Federal Agencies
Meaning, cut, cut, cut even though IT is vital to the day to day operations & success of the organization. I think we can certainly cut and stay secure. It is just changing mindset that security is part of daily operation.
Dr.T
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50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/26/2018 | 12:52:50 PM
Re: Reasons why these things continue to happen at Federal Agencies
Many organizations view IT as non revenue generating and thus treat them in that manner. That would be true. Organizations would try to avoid expenses for security as much as possible.
Dr.T
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50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/26/2018 | 12:51:49 PM
Re: Reasons why these things continue to happen at Federal Agencies
They only care about fulfilling their core mission. I assume they are blinded by the regulations bit they do not have to obey obviously.
Dr.T
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50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/26/2018 | 12:50:31 PM
Re: Reasons why these things continue to happen at Federal Agencies
because their superiors do not care about security unless a breach is publicized and they become embarrassed Yes, this represents a cultural issue in the agencies.
Dr.T
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50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/26/2018 | 12:49:23 PM
Re: Reasons why these things continue to happen at Federal Agencies
Even when there are qualified IT security professionals, they are often overruled in their attempts to increase security, I would guess this might be the norm. They do not want to spend money on security most likely as it gests expensive in most cases.
Dr.T
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50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/26/2018 | 12:47:59 PM
Re: Reasons why these things continue to happen at Federal Agencies
Also, the pay structures of the federal government do not generally allow the agencies to pay what they need to pay for qualified IT security personnel. If I guess I would guess that is is less about money/personel than the culture of the agencies.
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
12/26/2018 | 12:46:28 PM
Re: Reasons why these things continue to happen at Federal Agencies
Federal Agencies are loathe to spend money on IT security because it is not central to their mission. That is true too. It should be part of their mission definition in my view.
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