Comments
Abandoned Websites Haunt Corporations
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
10/29/2018 | 8:28:28 PM
2FA
This means a US company has an average of 85.1 applications that can be easily discovered externally and are not protected by 2FA,,,, This is interesting. Most internet applications do not use 2FA, it ps not surprising.
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
10/29/2018 | 8:22:45 PM
70%
70% of the FT 500 can find information for accessing old websites for sale on the Dark Web 70% is quite high, it must be quite profitable.
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
10/29/2018 | 8:20:49 PM
Re: Abandoned anything
they still host data that serve in arrows pointing to places I agree, developers may be forgetting citing the access to the data as they forget shutting down the application.
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
10/29/2018 | 8:18:34 PM
Re: Abandoned anything
Homes - subway stations (fascinating) and more always invite BAD somewhere in time. Web site may be good but when accessing in strarbuks it is being exposed to threats.
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
10/29/2018 | 8:15:57 PM
Website is not the problem
Website is not the problem, data behind that are the concern, lots of all web applications access the database without upgraded security measures.
REISEN1955
50%
50%
REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
10/24/2018 | 3:14:55 PM
Abandoned anything
Homes - subway stations (fascinating) and more always invite BAD somewhere in time.  Not surprised about dead websites, they still host data that serve in arrows pointing to places perhaps not accessible directly.


How the US Chooses Which Zero-Day Vulnerabilities to Stockpile
Ricardo Arroyo, Senior Technical Product Manager, Watchguard Technologies,  1/16/2019
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
The Year in Security 2018
This Dark Reading Tech Digest explores the biggest news stories of 2018 that shaped the cybersecurity landscape.
Flash Poll
How Enterprises Are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
How Enterprises Are Attacking the Cybersecurity Problem
Data breach fears and the need to comply with regulations such as GDPR are two major drivers increased spending on security products and technologies. But other factors are contributing to the trend as well. Find out more about how enterprises are attacking the cybersecurity problem by reading our report today.
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2019-3906
PUBLISHED: 2019-01-18
Premisys Identicard version 3.1.190 contains hardcoded credentials in the WCF service on port 9003. An authenticated remote attacker can use these credentials to access the badge system database and modify its contents.
CVE-2019-3907
PUBLISHED: 2019-01-18
Premisys Identicard version 3.1.190 stores user credentials and other sensitive information with a known weak encryption method (MD5 hash of a salt and password).
CVE-2019-3908
PUBLISHED: 2019-01-18
Premisys Identicard version 3.1.190 stores backup files as encrypted zip files. The password to the zip is hard-coded and unchangeable. An attacker with access to these backups can decrypt them and obtain sensitive data.
CVE-2019-3909
PUBLISHED: 2019-01-18
Premisys Identicard version 3.1.190 database uses default credentials. Users are unable to change the credentials without vendor intervention.
CVE-2019-3910
PUBLISHED: 2019-01-18
Crestron AM-100 before firmware version 1.6.0.2 contains an authentication bypass in the web interface's return.cgi script. Unauthenticated remote users can use the bypass to access some administrator functionality such as configuring update sources and rebooting the device.