Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Comments
Half of Small Businesses Believe They're Not Cybercrime Targets
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
Joe Stanganelli
50%
50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
8/29/2018 | 11:01:14 PM
Point of password pedantry
"76% of them say they haven't activated multifactor authentication"

Of those who say that they have, I'd further wonder how many of those are correct -- i.e., truly know what MFA means.

(Classic example of confusion: A password + a password hint is not MFA. It's the same factor ("something you know") duplicated.)
REISEN1955
50%
50%
REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
8/29/2018 | 10:10:44 AM
Re: As a managed services consultant
All comments appreciated and the two largest impediments to Small Business being security aware is Knowledge and Cost of that Knowledge.  Having a CISSP on staff is totally unwaranted expense - there is not that much demand for full-time work and salary?  Forget it.  THIS is where the consultant can play and needs to play a key, leading role.  And most consultants understand servers, active directory, backups, etc and oh scan with malwarebytes --- but not much more than that and have to have an in-depth knowledge of multilple lan networks.  The larger managed services shops can also play a larger role than they do.  
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
8/29/2018 | 9:37:16 AM
Re: As a managed services consultant
It is therefore the explicit job of the consultant to educate, advise and prep for cyber security I would agree. I do not know if consultants really get any opportunity to educate, they cost too. So still the same problem: Money.
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
8/29/2018 | 9:34:30 AM
Re: As a managed services consultant
But the lack insight, concentrating immed on their own problemsas they have to and do not have insight. This makes sense. Not having insight on cybercrime is main problem. If they can just read the news that may help them a lot I would say.
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
8/29/2018 | 9:32:08 AM
Re: As a managed services consultant
They are not CHEAP but some owners just are One of the ways for them to be secure is to use cloud solutions instead of on-prem systems.
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
8/29/2018 | 9:32:07 AM
Re: As a managed services consultant
They are not CHEAP but some owners just are One of the ways for them to be secure is to use cloud solutions instead of on-prem systems.
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
8/29/2018 | 9:30:13 AM
Re: As a managed services consultant
small businesses have no idea of IT protocols and hesitate to write checks for any investments. I agree. Money is one of the reasons why they may not want to pay attention to cyber security.
Dr.T
50%
50%
Dr.T,
User Rank: Ninja
8/29/2018 | 9:28:12 AM
51%
This is really a high number. It is hard to understand how anybody would still think that thier organization is not target.
REISEN1955
50%
50%
REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
8/27/2018 | 3:39:10 PM
As a managed services consultant
i used to support small businesses before moving south and into cyber security but in general small businesses have no idea of IT protocols and hesitate to write checks for any investments.  They are not CHEAP but some owners just are.  Some of them I hated and some paid me on the spot.  But the lack insight, concentrating immed on their own problemsas they have to and do not have insight.  It is therefore the explicit job of the consultant to educate, advise and prep for cyber security issues of all kinds.  Some wil llisten and some will not.  All will get attacked.  


COVID-19: Latest Security News & Commentary
Dark Reading Staff 8/10/2020
Pen Testers Who Got Arrested Doing Their Jobs Tell All
Kelly Jackson Higgins, Executive Editor at Dark Reading,  8/5/2020
Researcher Finds New Office Macro Attacks for MacOS
Curtis Franklin Jr., Senior Editor at Dark Reading,  8/7/2020
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon Contest
Current Issue
Special Report: Computing's New Normal, a Dark Reading Perspective
This special report examines how IT security organizations have adapted to the "new normal" of computing and what the long-term effects will be. Read it and get a unique set of perspectives on issues ranging from new threats & vulnerabilities as a result of remote working to how enterprise security strategy will be affected long term.
Flash Poll
The Changing Face of Threat Intelligence
The Changing Face of Threat Intelligence
This special report takes a look at how enterprises are using threat intelligence, as well as emerging best practices for integrating threat intel into security operations and incident response. Download it today!
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-17448
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-11
Telegram Desktop through 2.1.13 allows a spoofed file type to bypass the Dangerous File Type Execution protection mechanism, as demonstrated by use of the chat window with a filename that lacks an extension.
CVE-2020-17466
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-11
Turcom TRCwifiZone through 2020-08-10 allows authentication bypass by visiting manage/control.php and ignoring 302 Redirect responses.
CVE-2020-11552
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-11
An elevation of privilege vulnerability exists in ManageEngine ADSelfService Plus before build 6003 because it does not properly enforce user privileges associated with a Certificate dialog. This vulnerability could allow an unauthenticated attacker to escalate privileges on a Windows host. An attac...
CVE-2020-13124
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-11
SABnzbd 2.3.9 and 3.0.0Alpha2 has a command injection vulnerability in the web configuration interface that permits an authenticated user to execute arbitrary Python commands on the underlying operating system.
CVE-2020-15597
PUBLISHED: 2020-08-11
SOPlanning 1.46.01 allows persistent XSS via the Project Name, Statutes Comment, Places Comment, or Resources Comment field.