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8 Security Tips for a Hassle-Free Summer Vacation
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Patrick Ciavolella
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Patrick Ciavolella,
User Rank: Author
7/23/2018 | 8:26:06 AM
Basic items too often forgotten
Great read, and all very interesting items that are often forgotten when "vacation mode" kicks in.  Updating passwords, or simply change them before you leave and once you return in my case, is a great tactic that is almost never used by the general population.  Physical Security is a big item people often forget about.  Posts made on Social Media stating you are out of town and gone until a certain date open the door for home security and theft, but are almost never thought about in the moment.  
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
6/25/2018 | 11:31:53 PM
Re: Not just for vacations
@REISEN: You wouldn't believe how frequently people I barely know (if not strangers) send PDFs to me. Legitimate ones. But I refuse to open them without some sort of verification, because they should know better, period.
REISEN1955
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REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
6/25/2018 | 8:18:16 AM
Re: Not just for vacations
Public Wife is a danger of course but always more dangerous is the User accessing stupidly on the network, whether corporate protected or wide open pubic.  The basics are easy - never open attachments unless WELL known and verified.  Watch web browsing always.  Watch activity.  SCAN system upon boot always.  If suspect, shut down immed.  Sys restore if you want.  Simple, easy things. 
Joe Stanganelli
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50%
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
6/23/2018 | 6:33:10 PM
Not just for vacations
These tips are important outside of the vacation context too. For my own part, I don't access public Wi-Fi period except in the rarest of circumstances with the least circumstantial risk.


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