Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Comments
Email Security Tools Try to Keep Up with Threats
Oldest First  |  Newest First  |  Threaded View
BrianN060
BrianN060,
User Rank: Ninja
5/10/2018 | 4:04:36 PM
We made email the vulnerability it is today
Thanks for the article on BEC.  

As mentioned, attachments were a principle source of compromise; but no longer necessary, because of other features added for our convenience.  We still refer to these communications as email (electronic mail); though the reference to letters exchanged by post retains little relevance. 

Each letter was an item traveling from one address to another; each email is packet-ized and the packets disseminated to countless waypoints to be copied and forwarded to countless more; in a process that only ends when the addressee (an IP address node device, not a person), informs the internet that at least one copy of each packet in the parcel has arrived at its destination - effectively, emails are broadcast.  Thinking of email, in terms of postal mail (with all our assumptions and experience with that), was a misconception from the get-go.  Maybe "pradio" (personal radio transmitter/receiver), would have given us a clearer picture of what we would be dealing with. 

Postal mail attachments were harmless (unless dipped in poison), at least until any forms were filled out and returned.  Email attachments can carry malware, but imbedded  images (blocks of binary we take to be interpreted as a picture), can serve just as well.  Yes, we can be warned that "images were prevented... "; but legit senders want us to see them, and we want to see what "they" sent - so we revert to the postal mail assumptions that the sender is who they say they are, and download the images. 

What would today's email be without hyperlinks - a lot less of a vulnerability.  With a single click, we can be whisked away to who knows where, or agree to who knows what.   

Maybe the way to make email safer is to make it less 21st century.  At least with business emails, treat the process of sending and accepting them more as we would have with business letters:  Be a little more formal.  Always include specifics in the subject line.  Be more sparing in how many emails you send (pretend it cost you postage and the pay of a secretary to take dictation, correct your grammar, and type it on to your company's stationary).  Offer to send attachments - if they request them in a reply. 

If we keep in mind that email is not mail; yet treat it a little more as if it were, we'd all have less to worry about. 
JTEmailSec
JTEmailSec,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/29/2018 | 2:06:36 PM
The challenge is human behavior - not the technology
Ultimately there's not much that technology can do when people are going to click through to malicious websites, go into spam to open russian bride offers, or wire someone money without using MFA. 

The tools are really powerful, filter in the 99.9%+ of spam or even emails that are questionable.

 


Edge-DRsplash-10-edge-articles
I Smell a RAT! New Cybersecurity Threats for the Crypto Industry
David Trepp, Partner, IT Assurance with accounting and advisory firm BPM LLP,  7/9/2021
News
Attacks on Kaseya Servers Led to Ransomware in Less Than 2 Hours
Robert Lemos, Contributing Writer,  7/7/2021
Commentary
It's in the Game (but It Shouldn't Be)
Tal Memran, Cybersecurity Expert, CYE,  7/9/2021
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
Improving Enterprise Cybersecurity With XDR
Enterprises are looking at eXtended Detection and Response technologies to improve their abilities to detect, and respond to, threats. While endpoint detection and response is not new to enterprise security, organizations have to improve network visibility, expand data collection and expand threat hunting capabilites if they want their XDR deployments to succeed. This issue of Tech Insights also includes: a market overview for XDR from Omdia, questions to ask before deploying XDR, and an XDR primer.
Flash Poll
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2021-31677
PUBLISHED: 2022-07-06
An issue was discovered in PESCMS-V2.3.3. There is a CSRF vulnerability that can modify admin and other members' passwords.
CVE-2021-31678
PUBLISHED: 2022-07-06
An issue was discovered in PESCMS-V2.3.3. There is a CSRF vulnerability that can delete import information about a user's company.
CVE-2021-31679
PUBLISHED: 2022-07-06
An issue was discovered in PESCMS-V2.3.3. There is a CSRF vulnerability that allows attackers to delete admin and other members' account numbers.
CVE-2021-37839
PUBLISHED: 2022-07-06
Apache Superset up to 1.5.1 allowed for authenticated users to access metadata information related to datasets they have no permission on. This metadata included the dataset name, columns and metrics.
CVE-2022-24138
PUBLISHED: 2022-07-06
IOBit Advanced System Care (Asc.exe) 15 and Action Download Center both download components of IOBit suite into ProgramData folder, ProgramData folder has "rwx" permissions for unprivileged users. Low privilege users can use SetOpLock to wait for CreateProcess and switch the genuine compon...