Dark Reading is part of the Informa Tech Division of Informa PLC

This site is operated by a business or businesses owned by Informa PLC and all copyright resides with them.Informa PLC's registered office is 5 Howick Place, London SW1P 1WG. Registered in England and Wales. Number 8860726.

Comments
Email Security Tools Try to Keep Up with Threats
Newest First  |  Oldest First  |  Threaded View
JTEmailSec
50%
50%
JTEmailSec,
User Rank: Apprentice
5/29/2018 | 2:06:36 PM
The challenge is human behavior - not the technology
Ultimately there's not much that technology can do when people are going to click through to malicious websites, go into spam to open russian bride offers, or wire someone money without using MFA. 

The tools are really powerful, filter in the 99.9%+ of spam or even emails that are questionable.

 
BrianN060
50%
50%
BrianN060,
User Rank: Ninja
5/10/2018 | 4:04:36 PM
We made email the vulnerability it is today
Thanks for the article on BEC.  

As mentioned, attachments were a principle source of compromise; but no longer necessary, because of other features added for our convenience.  We still refer to these communications as email (electronic mail); though the reference to letters exchanged by post retains little relevance. 

Each letter was an item traveling from one address to another; each email is packet-ized and the packets disseminated to countless waypoints to be copied and forwarded to countless more; in a process that only ends when the addressee (an IP address node device, not a person), informs the internet that at least one copy of each packet in the parcel has arrived at its destination - effectively, emails are broadcast.  Thinking of email, in terms of postal mail (with all our assumptions and experience with that), was a misconception from the get-go.  Maybe "pradio" (personal radio transmitter/receiver), would have given us a clearer picture of what we would be dealing with. 

Postal mail attachments were harmless (unless dipped in poison), at least until any forms were filled out and returned.  Email attachments can carry malware, but imbedded  images (blocks of binary we take to be interpreted as a picture), can serve just as well.  Yes, we can be warned that "images were prevented... "; but legit senders want us to see them, and we want to see what "they" sent - so we revert to the postal mail assumptions that the sender is who they say they are, and download the images. 

What would today's email be without hyperlinks - a lot less of a vulnerability.  With a single click, we can be whisked away to who knows where, or agree to who knows what.   

Maybe the way to make email safer is to make it less 21st century.  At least with business emails, treat the process of sending and accepting them more as we would have with business letters:  Be a little more formal.  Always include specifics in the subject line.  Be more sparing in how many emails you send (pretend it cost you postage and the pay of a secretary to take dictation, correct your grammar, and type it on to your company's stationary).  Offer to send attachments - if they request them in a reply. 

If we keep in mind that email is not mail; yet treat it a little more as if it were, we'd all have less to worry about. 


Commentary
Cyberattacks Are Tailored to Employees ... Why Isn't Security Training?
Tim Sadler, CEO and co-founder of Tessian,  6/17/2021
Edge-DRsplash-10-edge-articles
7 Powerful Cybersecurity Skills the Energy Sector Needs Most
Pam Baker, Contributing Writer,  6/22/2021
News
Microsoft Disrupts Large-Scale BEC Campaign Across Web Services
Kelly Sheridan, Staff Editor, Dark Reading,  6/15/2021
Register for Dark Reading Newsletters
White Papers
Video
Cartoon
Current Issue
The State of Cybersecurity Incident Response
In this report learn how enterprises are building their incident response teams and processes, how they research potential compromises, how they respond to new breaches, and what tools and processes they use to remediate problems and improve their cyber defenses for the future.
Flash Poll
Twitter Feed
Dark Reading - Bug Report
Bug Report
Enterprise Vulnerabilities
From DHS/US-CERT's National Vulnerability Database
CVE-2020-7862
PUBLISHED: 2021-06-24
A vulnerability in agent program of HelpU remote control solution could allow an authenticated remote attacker to execute arbitrary commands This vulnerability is due to insufficient input santization when communicating customer process.
CVE-2021-21737
PUBLISHED: 2021-06-24
A smart STB product of ZTE is impacted by a permission and access control vulnerability. Due to insufficient protection of system application, attackers could use this vulnerability to tamper with the system desktop and affect system customization functions. This affects: ZXV10 B860H V5.0, V83011303...
CVE-2021-25923
PUBLISHED: 2021-06-24
In OpenEMR, versions 5.0.0 to 6.0.0.1 are vulnerable to weak password requirements as it does not enforce a maximum password length limit. If a malicious user is aware of the first 72 characters of the victim user’s password, he can leverage it to an account takeover.
CVE-2021-25655
PUBLISHED: 2021-06-24
A vulnerability in the system Service Menu component of Avaya Aura Experience Portal may allow URL Redirection to any untrusted site through a crafted attack. Affected versions include 7.0 through 7.2.3 (without hotfix) and 8.0.0 (without hotfix).
CVE-2021-25656
PUBLISHED: 2021-06-24
Stored XSS injection vulnerabilities were discovered in the Avaya Aura Experience Portal Web management which could allow an authenticated user to potentially disclose sensitive information. Affected versions include 7.0 through 7.2.3 (without hotfix) and 8.0.0 (without hotfix).