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Deconstructing the Possibilities and Realities of Enterprise IoT Security
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QuadStack
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QuadStack,
User Rank: Author
4/26/2018 | 1:34:23 PM
Re: Practical Security for IOT
Hey Jim - First of all, thank you for reading and commenting. Securing home IoT devies is actually not so bad. There are some good tips when it comes to making sure your home devices work. Here are a few thoughts:

1. Create a seperate network ONLY for IoT devices.

2. Only allow devices to join your network via known MAC addresses. This will prevent any unwanted devices from trying to get in. In fact, on your seperate network, you can restrict any device joining it unless you specifically entered in the MAC address yourself.

3. If you have a hub at home - like a Wink, for example - make sure that it remains up-to-date.

4. Keeping your devices firmware and software updated is key. It's not always easy, we have a lot of devices at home. However, look at your apps regularly to see if there are updates. 

5. Newer routers have some really cool 'fencing' solutions which prevent people from parking outside your house and spoofing your WiFi - look for networking gear which can provide a bit more security like that.

6. Passwords upkeep is important. Again, if you're connecting through a centralized hub - changing your password every now and again is a good idea. 

7. If you've got things like sensors, actuators, or something else that collects and then delivers data to a centralized aggregation engine - make sure that VM, server, or machine is locked down as well. Virtualization is a great way to centralize your VMs and ensure networks and data remain secure.

8. If you're working with a hub or some kind of centralized IoT platform, restrict access, ensure complex passwords, and make sure to check for updates regularly.

Of course, there are even more tips out there depending on the kind of devices you're using. But this is a good start.
jla56@sbcglobal.net
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[email protected],
User Rank: Apprentice
4/26/2018 | 12:31:48 PM
Practical Security for IOT
As a homeowner with IOT and even more so as a security professional whose company has a lot of IOT, I am very concerned about security.  But I have yet to read an article that provides concrete suggestions other than to separate IOT devices from other devices (which ones? how?) and to change passwords (how?) and to block unused ports/services (how?) and keep software updated (big-time how?).  

I am not trying to be smart or critical and I realize this would be different for most devices.  But front line people (and that includes consumers) need a way to get actionable information, not just generic suggestions.  

Let me know if I can be part of the solution.  I'll be happy to do something, if someone can point me in the right direction.  

Regards,

Jim ANderson


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