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Who Does What in Cybersecurity at the C-Level
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toprasage
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toprasage,
User Rank: Apprentice
3/16/2018 | 1:26:29 PM
Who Does What in Cybersecurity at the C-Level
 "Organizations live and die by data,"

Totally agree !
antivirussupport12
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antivirussupport12,
User Rank: Strategist
3/17/2018 | 3:07:57 PM
Re: Who Does What in Cybersecurity at the C-Level
This post is good.
REISEN1955
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REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
3/16/2018 | 2:31:07 PM
For what it is worth - at Equivax
Simple: ignore the problem when it surfaces, sell stock before the problem is announced, blame the entire catastrophe on one (1) Information Tech hire,  Latter means a horrible implementation of protocols across the board.  
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
3/22/2018 | 10:40:48 AM
CISOs
It's eye-opening that so many CISOs continue to report to CIOs despite the clear conflict of interest between those two offices that has been discussed for a few years now ( and which I wrote about for Dark Reading's sister site, InformationWeek, here: informationweek.com/strategic-cio/cyber-security-and-the-cio-changing-the-conversation/a/d-id/1320660? ).

Still, I don't buy IDC's prediction (IDC tends to have pretty wild predictions and forecasts for the future, anyway) -- especially considering that there are so many other (probably better) alternatives for the CISO to report to. The CFO looks like it's the best choice, particularly as the CFO's role comes to encompass more types of risk assessment and risk management. The General Counsel is another viable alternative. (Some even go so far as to propose that the CISO report directly to the board, but that's really pushing things IMHO.)
gxmundy@gmail.com
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[email protected],
User Rank: Apprentice
3/22/2018 | 11:15:35 AM
CISOs and C levels
Who CISOs report to is a matter of deniability. That position is seen by C levels as the scapegoat for the eventual security breach. I agree that its a conflict in security terms to roll it under the CIO but its a business decision to not roll it under any other Executive.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
3/23/2018 | 10:02:28 AM
Re: CISOs and C levels
@gxmundy: Alas, your cynicism is on the mark. CISOs, CIOs, CTOs, and even CEOs are often the first to go -- sacrificed so as to appease politicians -- when a major breach splashes across the headlines.

Perhaps, however, if there was more uniformity as to how the CISO position worked and where it was placed in the org chart, there would be a better understanding of it to legitimize it further.

Whether an organization wants that or not, however, is a different story.
BrianN060
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BrianN060,
User Rank: Ninja
3/23/2018 | 1:43:18 PM
Re: C-level roles
Fine article, nicely outlines enterprise IT responsibilities. 

@Joe S.: Yes, calling C-levels on the carpet, so that congressional committee members can harang the "witnesses" and demonstrate their outrage to their constituents, is a lot easier than understanding the problem or providing solutions (or explaining why they, the legislators, failed to enact reasoned and pragmatic regulation, which would have prevented the incident, or limited the damage). 
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
3/24/2018 | 6:56:41 AM
Re: C-level roles
@Brian: Not even at the federal level, either. I have a colleague who likes to say that "AG" doesn't stand for "Attorney General"; it really stands for "Aspiring Governor"!

It's a lot easier to keep the state AG's office (among other regulatory bodies) from hitting you with all kinds of fines and added oversight if you can demonstrate you're doing everything you can to rectify the situation -- and a sacrificial C-suite lamb goes a long way.
szurier210
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szurier210,
User Rank: Moderator
3/23/2018 | 10:05:32 AM
Re: CISOs and C levels
Remember that CISO really means: Career Is Surely Over!!!
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
3/24/2018 | 6:58:08 AM
Re: CISOs and C levels
@szurier: Alas, one of many reasons why it has become so difficult to attract people to the role. That, and, of course, low salaries.

We don't have a cybersecurity talent shortage. We have a cybersecurity compensation shortage!


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