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Advanced Deception: How It Works & Why Attackers Hate It
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REISEN1955
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REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
1/12/2018 | 8:36:52 AM
Re: First problem that comes to mind is
How much risk by not knowing?  Answer:  Equifax - near total destruction of trust.

How much will it cost:  Answer: Equifax shareholder value loss and potential loss of C-Suite job.

I think executives would understand the simple answer. 
ctcrandall
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ctcrandall,
User Rank: Author
1/11/2018 | 2:41:30 PM
Re: First problem that comes to mind is
It is extremely difficult for CISOs to understand the value behind over 3000 security offerings. Deception technology gets no special exemption from this challenge. The question to ask the C-Suite is how confident are they in knowing if threats have bypassed security controls and are mounting an attack within their network. If they are not 100% confident (who really can be sure?), then deception is an accurate and efficient solution for early threat detection. Does it work? It's pretty easy to test in a POC or stand up during a Pen Test. So, it really boils down to how much risk are they willing to take by not knowing and what will it cost if they are wrong.
REISEN1955
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50%
REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
1/5/2018 | 1:22:49 PM
First problem that comes to mind is
Getting approval from the dumb C-Suite to spend actual and for real MONEY on a server structure that does NOTHING perse but emulates something else.  They would not get the benefits and risk-rewards involved and view it as a line-item expense only. 


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