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Critical Microprocessor Flaws Affect Nearly Every Machine
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MelBrandle
MelBrandle,
User Rank: Moderator
7/18/2018 | 10:13:28 PM
Re: Simple Solution
This is highly worrying but somehow rather expected too. As long as you are connected to the internet, your device remains in a vulnerable state. You can install preventive softwares but they can only do so much. Let's just hope the sensitive data that you have remains safe with the latest upgrades that you need to regularly update to avoid becoming an easy target.
REISEN1955
REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
1/5/2018 | 8:33:12 AM
Simple Solution
I read this morning that there is a simple solution here and it is so in theory.  REPLACE EVERYTHING.  With what i do not know but JUST REPLACE EVERY COMPUTER EVERYWHERE.  Remember too we are talking servers, data center machines, peripherals --- just replace.  Consider the impact!!!!!!   And if you accept this premise --- replace with, eh ---- WHAT precisely?????  No new technologies that I have heard of discussed so far.  Just PATCH PATCH AND PATCH and be careful out there. 
REISEN1955
REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
1/4/2018 | 2:26:09 PM
Re: Something missing from article
Agree - and many patches are due to be released by damn near everybody so I can see a trend that any software that accesses the processor (define now - everything) can be a source of penetration.  What really disturbs me (my 8088 rants aside) is that it has taken YEARS for somebody to notice this one.  We now have decade or longer vulnerability ranges which is terrifying.  
RalphDaly28
RalphDaly28,
User Rank: Apprentice
1/4/2018 | 1:03:18 PM
Something missing from article
What I havent' seen explictly in the articles I have read about this is the nature of the programs that can execute this attack. For instance, can viewing a web page execute the attack? Or does it require that an actual EXE be executed on the machine? The reports I have seen so far imply that it an attack would require a program to execute on an affected machine. But it is implied only.
REISEN1955
REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
1/4/2018 | 10:57:12 AM
Re: Something to be said for the 8088
Asking alot of this community, but there was some really fun stuff for that ancient sys.  KINGDOM OF KROZ and variants were wonderful games.  The screen MENU programs were delightful in simplicity and I sitll enjoyed old Word Perfect 4.2 as well.  How many of us cut our teeth on LOTUS 1-2-3.  You could do great stuff on these old platforms. 
REISEN1955
REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
1/4/2018 | 10:38:31 AM
Something to be said for the 8088
I am sorry to an extent that I no longer own my trusty clone IBM XT system, that 8088 was indeed secure and back in 1985 malware written for DOS 6.22 was indeed rare.  Internet barely exists and I used Compuserve (EasyPlex email) to communicate with the outside world.  Inter-system connect was through PROCOMM (ah, there was a good product).   Times change and not necessarily for the better. 


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