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2 Million Fake Net Neutrality Comments Stole American Identities
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Joe Stanganelli
Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
12/18/2017 | 7:09:16 PM
Addresses of commenters
WTH?

I'm really concerned how much of these comments are a matter of public record. People's names and addresses are often enough to commit identity theft.

Of course, the same goes for most voting records.

It's a shame, really.
REISEN1955
REISEN1955,
User Rank: Ninja
12/15/2017 | 3:41:25 PM
Re: Ratio of "pro" to "con" fake posts could suggest unseen economic or political motives
As a past resident of NY State, I have many reasons to hate ALBANY and all that goes on there.  BUT ONE WORD OF GREAT ADVICE ----- IF you have or had relatives in the state, checked UNCLAIMED FUNDS ---- We came away with a substantial chunk of unknown change in the XX,XXX.xx number range. 
gruntsters
gruntsters,
User Rank: Strategist
12/15/2017 | 11:35:21 AM
Re: Ratio of "pro" to "con" fake posts could suggest unseen economic or political motives
I agree. Which way did the 2 million accounts lean? Why hasn't the NY AG listed this information?
SchemaCzar
SchemaCzar,
User Rank: Strategist
12/15/2017 | 9:17:28 AM
Ratio of "pro" to "con" fake posts could suggest unseen economic or political motives
Schneiderman's office did a valuable service.  Now this is definitely one of the more useless ways of gauging public opinion - no real authenticated identity to canvass citizens?  

However, the question I have is what is the ratio pro/con of fake comments?  If we see one side or the other exerting money and effort to swing the decision, it may lead us to hidden consequences of rescinding or preserving net neutrality that would give us further information in this important debate.

It's sort of disappointing that Schneiderman did not reveal this ratio.


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