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Uber's Security Slip-ups: What Went Wrong
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ebyjeeby
ebyjeeby,
User Rank: Strategist
12/14/2017 | 5:20:42 PM
scramble data
Uber should have scrambled the data before it went into the test environment.
jdub161
jdub161,
User Rank: Apprentice
11/30/2017 | 11:14:16 PM
What went wrong 'after the incident'
Great article Kelly, but what went wrong after the incident?

Understand that it's critical to understand what went wrong to cause the incident, but I feel it would be very insightful to understand who made the decision not to disclose the incident.  

Where did that decision occur?  At Uber's Board, CEO, Legal team.  Even if that decision was left to the CISO then that's actually a damning indictment on their delegation of authority. 

I understand that Uber want to offer up the CISO as the official 'scapegoat' but wow if the standard response to a major data breach is 'sack the CISO' then in not to long we will be faced with an understaffed industry having to fill strategic leadership positions potentially with highly skilled cyber security people that may not have had the training and experience to work at the strategic C suite level.

Jason 


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