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First US Federal CISO Shares Security Lessons Learned
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Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
11/30/2017 | 8:32:12 PM
Re: Executives wait for "technologists" to lock their own front doors
@SchemaCzar: Not just executives -- even the very top executives. An MIT professor once told me a story of how a company sent out "fake" phishing emails to its employees as a test, and one of the people who clicked on the link was a C-suite executive. When asked why he clicked on the link, the C-suiter responded, "I wanted to see what would happen."
SchemaCzar
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SchemaCzar,
User Rank: Strategist
11/30/2017 | 9:32:07 AM
Executives wait for "technologists" to lock their own front doors
Reading security news and the general news, I conclude that Touhill needs to talk tougher to executives.  There are too many stories of executives who can't be bothered to follow the same security policies that must be followed by others in the organization.  They are the highest-value person targets in the organization, and they often feel they can dump their own security on an underling, or worse, that security is the organization's problem rather than their personal responsibility.  I recently heard of a high-level VP in a large, regulated business who flat-out refused to follow password change, or even password complexity policy.  This was before password change policies were brought into question, but long after secure password managers were available that make password change and complexity requirements manageable.

Touhill is right that these executives think cybersecurity is a technology problem.  So is the physical security of their own homes: a technology problem.  If they treated home security the way they do organizational security, they wouldn't even lock their own front doors.
Joe Stanganelli
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Joe Stanganelli,
User Rank: Ninja
11/29/2017 | 8:30:55 PM
Basics
Reminds me of that old reality show "To Catch a Thief," which demonstrated to people how easy it was for burglars to break in and steal them blind in a matter of about ten minutes. Almost all the time, there was an unlocked window or unlocked door.

Same thing in cybersecurity. The bad guys don't go right to sophisticated techniques. They go to basic, common passwords and they go to recently announced zero-days to check for a lack of a patch.


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